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1973 Chilean Coup Topics

Chile1973

Democracy Now! coverage related to the U.S.-backed military coup in Chile on September 11, 1973, that led to the overthrow of President Salvador Allende and brought Gen. Augusto Pinochet to power. His regime murdered and tortured thousands during his repressive 17-year rule.

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  • Kissinger_pinochet
    A newly declassified document offers new evidence that former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger canceled a warning against carrying out a secret program of international political assassinations just days before former Chilean ambassador Orlando Letelier and his American colleague, Ronni Moffitt, were killed in Washington, DC. We speak with Peter Kornbluh of the National Security Archives. [includes rush transcript]
    Apr 12, 2010 | Story
  • Chilecoup_web
    While memorials were held across the US for the ninth anniversary of 9/11, we remember another 9/11: September 11th, 1973, when Salvador Allende, the democratically elected president of Chile, died in the palace as US-backed Pinochet forces rose to power. We speak with Juan Garcés, a personal adviser to Allende. He was the sole adviser to survive the coup and its aftermath. [includes rush transcript]
    Sep 15, 2010 | Story
  • Garzon_button
    Citing the doctrine of universal jurisdiction, Spanish judge Baltasar Garzón has used the Spanish courts to investigate cases of torture, war crimes and other offenses around the world. In 1998, he ordered the arrest of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, a move that led to Pinochet’s arrest and detention in Britain. In 2003, Garzón indicted Osama bin Laden and dozens of other members of al-Qaeda. Garzón later attempted to indict...
    May 12, 2011 | Story
  • Allende
    "That September 11, that lethal Tuesday morning, I awoke with dread to the sound of planes flying above my house. When, an hour later, I saw smoke billowing from the center of the city, I knew that life had changed for me, for my country, forever." Those are the words of our guest, Chilean-American author Ariel Dorfman, writing not about the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon 10 years ago this week, but...
    Sep 08, 2011 | Story
  • Splash_image20110908-1545-2whdxs-0
    On the anniversary of the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, we look back at several national and international events linked to that day. This year on September 11, India will mark the 105th anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi launching the modern nonviolent resistance movement. We play part of a 2003 interview with Gandhi’s grandson, Arun. On September 11, 1990, renowned Guatemalan anthropologist Myrna Mack was assassinated...
    Sep 08, 2011 | Story
  • Naomi_button
    In part two of our conversation with journalist and author Naomi Klein, she discusses how her book, "The Shock Doctrine," focuses in part on Chile, where the 1973 coup led to the privatization of education and now Chilean students are protesting in the streets. Klein talks about their demands and dismisses the critique that the related Occupy Wall Street movement lacks its own clear set of demands. [includes rush transcript]
    Oct 06, 2011 | Web Exclusive
  • Screen_shot_2012-08-03_at_9.34.05_am
    If Julian Assange is granted asylum in Ecuador, he will become a resident of Latin America, where the trove of classified U.S. State Department cables he strategically disseminated through WikiLeaks has generated hundreds of headlines, from Mexico to Chile. A year after thousands of cables on Latin America were first released, the revelations have had different results — in two countries it led to the forced departure of the U.S....
    Aug 03, 2012 | Story
  • Dirty_war_1
    A historic trial underway in Argentina is set to reveal new details about how Latin American countries coordinated with each other in the 1970s and '80s to eliminate political dissidents. The campaign known as "Operation Condor" involved military dictatorships in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. They worked together to track down, kidnap and kill people they labeled as terrorists: leftist activists,...
    Mar 07, 2013 | Story
  • Isabel_allende_democracy_now
    The best-selling Chilean novelist Isabel Allende is out with a new book, "Maya’s Notebook: A Novel." It tells the story of a teenager named Maya Vidal and her struggles with drug addiction, grief and history. Although a work of fiction, the story is rooted in real-life tragedy. Three of Allende’s stepchildren have struggled with addiction: Two of them have died of drug-related causes, one in 1994 and the other just a...
    Apr 30, 2013 | Story
  • Eduardo_galeano-1
    One of Latin America’s most acclaimed writers, Eduardo Galeano is out with the new book, "Children of the Days: A Calendar of Human History." Galeano’s classic "Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent" made headlines when Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez gave President Obama a copy at the Summit of the Americas in 2009. Since its publication in 1971, "Open Veins" has...
    May 08, 2013 | Story