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Africa Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Africa

Newest First | Oldest First
  • Lonmin_massacre-south_africa
    South African police shot dead 34 striking workers at platinum mine last week, setting off a wave of protests. In what has been described as "South Africa’s first post-apartheid massacre," the miners were killed after demanding more pay and walking off the job at the Marikana mine, the world’s third largest producer of platinum. South Africa’s national police chief Riah Phiyega is drawing public outrage for...
    August 21, 2012 | Story
  • Anglican_byamugisha_hiv
    We’re joined from the International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., by Rev. Canon Gideon Byamugisha. A prominent church leader in Uganda, in 1992 he became the first African religious leader to openly declare his HIV-positive status. He has since devoted his life to an AIDS ministry that works to end the stigma around the disease. Rev. Byamugisha discusses his historic decision and the ongoing discrimination against LGBTQ people in...
    July 27, 2012 | Story
  • How_the_us_rendered_2
    A new exposé by human rights investigator Clara Gutteridge for The Nation magazine looks at secret U.S. operations in Africa and how the United States rendered, tortured and discarded one innocent man from Tanzania. Suleiman Abdallah was captured in Mogadishu in 2003 by a Somali warlord and handed over to U.S. officials, who had him rendered to Afghanistan for five years of detention and torture. Imprisoned in three different U.S. facilities,...
    July 06, 2012 | Story
  • Button-kony1
    We look at the controversial video, "Kony 2012," that targets Joseph Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), a group notorious for kidnapping children, forcing boys to become fighters, and using girls as sex slaves in Central Africa. Released on March 5, it was viewed more than 100 million times online in just under a week, making it the most viral video in history. We speak with two Ugandans about the impact of the film and...
    April 18, 2012 | Story
  • Arby
    In September of 2010, renowned Malian musician Khaira Arby performed live in the Democracy Now! studio, where she also spoke with Amy Goodman about her pacifism, struggles of female musicians in Mali, and the potential impact of music in times of conflict. As we recently reported, Tuareg rebels in Mali have declared the independent state of Azawad after seizing Timbuktu and other major cities in the north.
    April 09, 2012 | Web Exclusive
  • Button-mali-soldiers
    The president of Mali, Amadou Toumani Touré, has formally resigned after soldiers ousted him in a coup in March, with power set to be transferred to Mali’s National Assembly after elections later this month. The soldiers say they seized power because of Touré’s alleged mishandling of a rebellion of ethnic Tuareg rebels, who have succeeded in capturing several key northern cities, declaring their independence and now calling for...
    April 09, 2012 | Story
  • Senegal-police-button
    Senegal appears headed to a runoff election after a heated first round of voting and a year of protests against President Abdoulaye Wade’s decision to seek a third term, despite a constitutional two-term limit. The protests are "the most bloody and blood-filled campaign that the country has ever known," says Arame Tall, a Senegalese analyst. Over the past year, a movement led by a number of Senegalese rappers has helped...
    February 28, 2012 | Story
  • Nigeria
    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Tuesday on whether U.S.-based corporations can be sued in U.S. courts for human rights abuses committed overseas. The case involves nine Nigerian activists, including Ken Saro-Wiwa, executed for protesting Royal Dutch Shell. We’re joined by Marco Simons, legal director of EarthRights International, which filed a "friend of the court" legal brief in this case and has been a pioneer...
    February 24, 2012 | Story
  • Splash_image20120222-19550-1bu17zb-0
    In a Black History Month special, today we spend the hour with the legendary pianist and composer Randy Weston. For the past six decades, Weston has been a pioneering jazz musician incorporating the vast rhythmic heritage of Africa. His most famous compositions include "Little Niles," "Blue Moses" and "Hi-Fly," and his 1960 album, "Uhuru Afrika," was a landmark recording that celebrated the independence...
    February 20, 2012 | Story
  • Splash_image20111227-28045-ha4mym-0
    Communities along Nigeria’s Niger Delta have been put on alert following a major oil spill from the oil giant, Shell. The massive oil slick is making its way to the Nigerian coast, threatening local wildlife and massive pollution along the shore. Much of the available information about the spill comes from the company responsible for it, Royal Dutch Shell, which says less than 40,000 barrels have leaked so far. But Nigeria’s...
    December 27, 2011 | Story