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African-American History Topics

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Search our vast archive of interviews with scholars, journalists, activists, key political figures, and authors.

Newest First | Oldest First
  • Blandfuneral_useme
    Hundreds gathered Saturday to remember Sandra Bland at the suburban Chicago church she attended for decades before moving to Waller County, Texas, where she was set to begin a new job but was then discovered dead in her jail cell after a traffic stop escalated into an arrest. The 28-year-old African-American woman’s family members stood before her open casket as they continued to dispute law enforcement claims she hung herself with the liner...
    July 27, 2015 | Story
  • Coates-3
    We spend the hour with Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of "Between the World and Me," an explosive new book about white supremacy and being black in America. The book begins, "Here is what I would like for you to know: In America, it is traditional to destroy the black body—it is heritage." It is written as a letter to his 15-year-old son, Samori, and is a combination of memoir, history and analysis. Its publication comes amidst...
    July 22, 2015 | Story
  • Bree-newsome-1
    As South Carolina state lawmakers begin debate on whether to remove the Confederate flag from the grounds of the state Capitol in Columbia, we are joined by Bree Newsome, the 30-year-old African-American woman who took down the flag herself. On June 27, 10 days after the Charleston massacre and one day after the funeral for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Newsome scaled the 30-foot flagpole at the state Capitol and took the flag in her hand....
    July 06, 2015 | Story
  • Bree-newsome-climbs-south-carolipitol-confederate-flag-remove-1
    On June 27, Bree Newsome, a 30-year-old African-American woman, was arrested at the state Capitol after scaling the 30-foot flagpole and unhooking the Confederate flag. As police officers shouted at her to come down, Bree Newsome shimmied to the top, took the flag in her hand and said, "You come against me with hatred and oppression and violence. I come against you in the name of God. This flag comes down today!" Newsome recited...
    July 03, 2015 | Story
  • Column_default
    By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

    Independence Day is a fitting time to reflect on the role that grass-roots organizing for social change has played in building this nation.

    July 02, 2015 | Columns & Articles
  • Churchfire
    The FBI is launching an investigation into fires set at seven different African-American churches in seven days. So far none of the blazes have been labeled as hate crimes, but investigators say at least three fires were caused by arson. The fires began on June 21, just days after the Charleston massacre, and have occurred in six different states: Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida and Ohio. We are joined by Richard...
    July 02, 2015 | Story
  • L3_boggs2-v2
    To mark her 100th birthday, we pay tribute to the legendary activist and Detroit-based community organizer Grace Lee Boggs. We play an excerpt of the documentary, "American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs," and revisit a 2008 Democracy Now! interview about Boggs’ work in the civil rights, Black Power, labor, environmental justice and feminist movements for seven decades.
    June 30, 2015 | Story
  • Orangeburg
    By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

    The largely unreported and forgotten Orangeburg Massacre happened Feb. 8, 1968, when students at South Carolina State University were protesting for access to the town’s only bowling alley and three young African-American men were killed.

    June 25, 2015 | Web Exclusive
  • Column_default
    By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan
    Indiana certainly doesn’t want to be remembered for being a bastion of hatred. So why did Indiana Gov. Mike Pence legalize a new wave of intolerance by signing into law Indiana’s controversial “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA)?
    April 02, 2015 | Columns & Articles
  • The-nation-150-anniversary-magazine-news
    The Nation magazine, the oldest news magazine in the United States, is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. The first issue was published on July 6, 1865 — just weeks after the end of the Civil War and three months after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Over the years, The Nation has published many of the nation’s leading dissidents, academics and activists. We broadcast an excerpt from the new documentary, "Hot...
    April 01, 2015 | Story