African-American History Topics

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Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to African-American History

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  • Freedomsummer5
    This week marks the 50th anniversary of the murders of three young civil rights workers who traveled to Mississippi for Freedom Summer, the historic campaign to register African-American voters. On June 21, 1964, James Chaney, Andy Goodman and Michael Schwerner went missing after they visited a church in Neshoba County, Mississippi, which the Ku Klux Klan had bombed because it was going to be used as a Freedom School. Forty-four days after the...
    Jun 26, 2014 | Story
  • Horne_front
    As the U.S. prepares to celebrate Independence Day on July 4, we spoke with historian Gerald Horne about the role slavery played in igniting the rebellion that led to the nation’s founding. Watch his interview, and read an excerpt from his new book, "The Counter-Revolution of 1776."
    Jun 26, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Battleoflongisland
    As the United States prepares to celebrate Independence Day, we look at why July 4 is not a cause for celebration for all. For Native Americans, it may be a bitter reminder of colonialism, which brought fatal diseases, cultural hegemony and genocide. Neither did the new republic’s promise of "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" extend to African Americans. The colonists who declared their freedom from England did not share...
    Jun 27, 2014 | Story
  • Peteseeger
    Earlier this year, the legendary folk singer and activist Pete Seeger died at the age of 94. For nearly seven decades, Seeger was a musical and political icon who helped create the modern American folk music movement. In the 1940s, he performed in The Almanac Singers with Woody Guthrie, and then formed The Weavers. In the 1950s, he opposed Senator Joseph McCarthy’s political witch hunt and was almost jailed for refusing to answer questions...
    Jul 04, 2014 | Story
  • Frederick_douglass_portrait
    In this Fourth of July holiday special, we begin with the words of Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery around 1818, Douglass became a key leader of the abolitionist movement. On July 5, 1852, in Rochester, New York, he gave one of his most famous speeches, "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro." He was addressing the Rochester Ladies Antislavery Society. This is actor James Earl Jones reading the speech during a performance of...
    Jul 04, 2014 | Story