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African-American History Topics

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Search our vast archive of interviews with scholars, journalists, activists, key political figures, and authors.

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  • Wx-juanita-nelson-tax-resistance
    Juanita Nelson, a longtime civil rights activist, war tax resister and farmer, has died at the age of 91 in Greenfield, Massachusetts.
    March 13, 2015 | Web Exclusive
  • 0311-webex-foner2
    As the nation prepares to mark the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War, we talk to historian Eric Foner about Reconstruction and the birth of a homegrown terrorist movement led by the Ku Klux Klan.
    March 11, 2015 | Web Exclusive
  • Foner-gateway-to-freedom-slavery-underground-railroad
    As tens of thousands gather in Selma, Alabama, to mark the 50th anniversary of the historic voting rights marches of 1965, we go back 150 years to look at another chapter of the freedom struggle of African Americans. Between 1830 and 1860, more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reached freedom thanks to networks of anti-slavery resistance — commonly known as the underground railroad. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and Columbia University...
    March 11, 2015 | Story
  • Mlkiiiselma50
    We continue our coverage of the 50th anniversary of the historic voting rights campaign in Selma, Alabama. On this day in 1965 — the second Tuesday of March — Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led a second attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery. Two days earlier on Bloody Sunday, Alabama state troopers beat peaceful marchers crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge. On what became known as Turnaround Tuesday, 2,000 protesters marched over the...
    March 10, 2015 | Story
  • Ctvivianselma50
    Just outside the historic Brown Chapel AME Church in Selma, Alabama, Amy Goodman had a chance to speak with the civil rights pioneer C. T. Vivian, a close friend and adviser to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Fifty years ago, Vivian was punched in the face by Dallas County Sheriff Jim Clark on the courthouse steps in Selma as he tried to escort a group of African Americans inside to register to vote. The punch was so hard, Clark broke his own hand....
    March 10, 2015 | Story
  • Jimmieleejacksonselma
    As we continue our coverage of the 50th anniversary of the historic Selma to Montgomery marches, we look at the civil rights martyrs who lost their lives in the fight to secure voting rights in Alabama. Between February and August of 1965, four civil rights activists were killed in Alabama: Jimmie Lee Jackson, Viola Liuzzo, Rev. James Reeb and Jonathan Daniels. As tens of thousands of people marked the 50th anniversary in Selma, Democracy Now!...
    March 10, 2015 | Story
  • Selmamarch
    Up to 80,000 marched in Selma, Alabama, on Sunday to mark the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. On March 7, 1965, hundreds of peaceful voting rights activists were brutally attacked by Alabama state troopers, crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge as they attempted to march from Selma to Montgomery in a voting rights protest. Bloody Sunday was the first of three attempted marches, finally completed under federal protection and led by Dr. Martin...
    March 10, 2015 | Story
  • Selma-march-1965-foot-soilders-2
    Tens of thousands of people, including President Obama and more than 100 members of Congress, traveled to Selma, Alabama, this weekend for the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. On March 7, 1965, hundreds of peaceful voting rights activists were brutally attacked by Alabama state troopers, crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge as they attempted to march from Selma to Montgomery. Bloody Sunday was the first of three attempted marches, finally...
    March 09, 2015 | Story
  • Amelia-boynton-robinson-v2
    Amy Goodman interviewed civil rights luminaries at the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge, including 103-year-old Amelia Boynton Robinson, who held President Obama’s hand as they marched on the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. Robinson played a key role in organizing the march and invited Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to Selma in 1965. "If you are not a registered voter and you are 18 years of age, you are a hopeless people. Definitely...
    March 09, 2015 | Story
  • Bernice-king-selma50
    Fifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was confronted by Alabama state troopers as he led a march across Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. This weekend, his daughter Bernice King was escorted across the bridge by an African-American state trooper. "The contrast between then and now is phenomenal, but the reality is we are at a crossroads," King says. She argues voting rights that were won in 1965 have since been gutted,...
    March 09, 2015 | Story