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Arab Spring Topics

Democracy Now! is following the popular uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa.

Newest First | Oldest First
  • Game-over
    We speak with journalist Anthony Shadid, two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, who is in Beirut where the government collapsed last week. Tunisia has "electrified people across the Arab world," Shadid says, "mainly for that prospect of change, that change can actually occur in a lot of countries that seem almost ossified at this point." [includes rush transcript]
    Jan 18, 2011 | Story
  • Egypt_hossam
    Tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets across Egypt in the largest popular challenge to longtime President Hosni Mubarak since he came into office 30 years ago. Drawing inspiration from the recent uprising in Tunisia, an estimated crowd of 15,000 packed Cairo’s Tahrir Square. We go to Cairo to speak with independent journalist and blogger, Hossam el-Hamalawy. [includes rush transcript]
    Jan 26, 2011 | Story
  • Jackshenker
    In Egypt, running battles between police and anti-government protesters continued into the early hours of Thursday morning. Police have arrested up to 1,200 people, including a number of journalists. Among them was Guardian reporter, Jack Shenker. He was arrested and beaten by plainclothes police on Tuesday night and shoved into a truck with dozens of other people. He managed to keep his dictaphone with him and recorded what was happening as...
    Jan 27, 2011 | Story
  • Mubarakposter
    Unprecedented protests in Egypt continue for a second day. On Wednesday, demonstrators defied a government ban on gatherings and took to streets in the biggest popular protests against President Hosni Mubarak in three decades. We go to Cairo to speak with Guardian reporter Jack Shenker. "That fear barrier seems to have been broken," Shenker says. "These are sort of middle-class people who are generally enjoying quite a...
    Jan 27, 2011 | Story
  • Mustafa
    In Egypt, protesters faced tear gas, water cannonand beatings from security forces on the streets of Cairo on Wednesday. Up to 1,200 people were arrested, including a number of journalists. Six people have reportedly been killed since Tuesday. Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton did not criticize the Egyptian government, saying only that the country was stable and Egyptians had the right to protest, while urging all parties to...
    Jan 27, 2011 | Story
  • Mail-1
    Protests have erupted across Egypt again today with the largest and most widespread anti-government demonstrations seen so far. In an unprecedented display of popular protest, hundreds of thousands of demonstrators are gathering in Cairo, Alexandria, Suez, Mansoura, Sharqiya and elsewhere. Intense confrontations are taking place with state security forces. The protests come amid a vast security clampdown. Earlier, the government blocked the...
    Jan 28, 2011 | Story
  • Juan_cole
    Hundreds of thousands have taken to the streets across Egypt today in the fourth day of unprecedented protests against the 30-year rule of President Hosni Mubarak. We speak with University of Michigan professor of history Juan Cole. "The Arab world has seen, in the last three decades, a series of Arab nationalist regimes, relatively secular, which have become increasingly sclerotic," Cole says. [includes rush transcript]
    Jan 28, 2011 | Story
  • Ahmad Shokr, an editor at the Egyptian daily newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm, files a report from Cairo on Saturday morning, day five of the largest anti-government protests in Egypt in decades. [includes rush transcript]
    Jan 29, 2011 | Web Exclusive
  • In his second report today from Cairo, newspaper editor Ahmad Shokr recaps the latest developments in Egypt: the rising death toll, the continuation of mass street protests, and Hosni Mubarak’s decision to name Omar Suleiman, the head of the country’s intelligence services, to be vice president. [includes rush transcript]
    Jan 29, 2011 | Web Exclusive
  • Cairo, Egypt — I grew up in Egypt. I spent half my life here. But Saturday, when my plane from JFK airport touched down in Cairo, I arrived in a different country than the one I had known all my life. This is not Hosni Mubarak’s Egypt anymore and, regardless of what happens, it will never be again.
    Jan 29, 2011 | News