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Detroit Topics

More than 10,000 citizens, activists and organizers gathered in Detroit in June for the second-ever US Social Forum. The theme was "Another World Is Possible. Another US Is Necessary. Another Detroit is Happening." Democracy Now! was in Detroit to broadcast during the conference and to take a closer look at the city of Detroit. Detroit was highlighted by conference organizers both for its example of the stark failures of capitalism as well as for its growing reputation as a model for renewal as a "movement city."

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  • Detroit-demolition
    Democracy Now! broadcasts from Detroit, where demolition crews have begun tearing town 3,000 buildings that the city has deemed dangerous as part of an estimated 10,000 buildings set to be demolished over the next four years. City officials claim the demolitions are taking place in abandoned neighborhoods and that they will be replaced with farmland. While the Mayor’s urban renewal plan has high-level backing, many have condemned it as a...
    Apr 02, 2010 | Story
  • Detroitschool
    Detroit plans to close more than a quarter of its public schools at a time when private foundations are pledging hundreds of millions of dollars to reshape the Detroit public school system. The foundations are pushing for mayoral control of the school and the opening of dozens of new schools, including charter schools. The plan is seen by critics as a move to privatize the city’s school system. [includes rush transcript]
    Apr 02, 2010 | Story