Domestic Spying Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Domestic Spying

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  • Privacy
    Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Julia Angwin joins us to discuss her new book, "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance." Currently at ProPublica and previously with The Wall Street Journal, Angwin details her complex and fraught path toward increasing her own online privacy. According to Angwin, the private data collected by East Germany’s Soviet-era Stasi...
    Apr 02, 2014 | Story
  • Mystic
    The latest disclosures from Edward Snowden show the National Security Agency is recording every single phone call made in an undisclosed foreign country. A surveillance system called MYSTIC stores the billions of phone conversations for up to 30 days. Agents are able to rewind and review any conversation within the previous month using a tool codenamed RETRO. One senior manager for the program compared it to a time machine. We speak to Ashkan...
    Mar 21, 2014 | Story
  • Amys_column_default
    By Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan

    This week’s public spat between CIA-loyalist Sen. Dianne Feinstein and that agency might briefly upset the status quo, but they will make up. Sadly, it obscures a graver problem: the untold story of the United States’ secret policy of torture and rendition (the latter is White House lingo for “kidnapping”).

    Mar 13, 2014 | Columns & Articles
  • Olympia-new
    More details have come to light showing how the U.S. military infiltrated and spied on a community of antiwar activists in the state of Washington. Democracy Now! first broke this story in 2009 when it was revealed that an active member of Students for a Democratic Society and Port Militarization Resistance was actually an informant for the U.S. military. The man everyone knew as "John Jacob" was in fact John Towery, a member of the...
    Feb 25, 2014 | Story
  • Nsa2
    A new report based on leaks by Edward Snowden reveals the National Security Agency played a role in the monitoring of a U.S. law firm that represented the Indonesian government during trade disputes with the United States. According to The New York Times, the NSA’s Australian counterpart told the agency it was spying on trade talks between the United States and Indonesia, including potentially privileged communications between Indonesian...
    Feb 18, 2014 | Story
  • Fbi
    One of the great mysteries of the Vietnam War era has been solved. On March 8, 1971, a group of activists — including a cabdriver, a day care director and two professors — broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania. They stole every document they found and then leaked many to the press, including details about FBI abuses and the then-secret counter-intelligence program to infiltrate, monitor and disrupt social and political movements,...
    Jan 08, 2014 | Story
  • Cointelpro1
    On Wednesday, Democracy Now! will interview three peace activists who just revealed their involvement in one of the biggest mysteries of the Vietnam War era — the 1971 break-in of an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania. The burglars took every paper in the office, including documents revealing the existence of the secret counter-intelligence program, nicknamed COINTELPRO, which at the time was targeting black nationalists, antiwar activists...
    Jan 07, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Nsa
    A federal judge ruled Monday the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records "almost certainly" violates the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against unreasonable searches. U.S. District Judge Richard Leon described the NSA’s activities as "almost Orwellian." He wrote, "I cannot imagine a more 'indiscriminate' and 'arbitrary invasion' than this systematic...
    Dec 17, 2013 | Story
  • Ruskin2
    In this web-only interview, we continue the discussion with Gary Ruskin, director of the Center for Corporate Policy, about the new report, "Spooky Business: Corporate Espionage Against Nonprofit Organizations."
    Nov 25, 2013 | Web Exclusive
  • Ruskin2
    A new report details how corporations are increasingly spying on nonprofit groups they regard as potential threats. The corporate watchdog organization Essential Information found a diverse groups of nonprofits have been targeted with espionage, including environmental, antiwar, public interest, consumer safety, pesticide reform, gun control, social justice, animal rights and arms control groups. The corporations carrying out the spying include...
    Nov 25, 2013 | Story