Education Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Education

Newest First | Oldest First
  • How much influence do corporations have in schools? Krystle Newquist will be entering ninth grade in a few weeks. But earlier this year, she was kicked off her little league team for refusing to wear the logo of the team’s sponsor — a tavern called "The Carousel." Krystle’s grandfather had suffered from alcoholism and cirrhosis of the liver.
    Aug 19, 1998 | Story
  • This week, members of the University of California’s regents called for a review of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. They are concerned that too many white affluent students are gaining an unfair advantage on the exam. [includes rush transcript]
    Jan 21, 2000 | Story
  • This week, the Justice Department and six major foundations released a report that concluded at every step of the juvenile justice system, Black and Latino youths are treated more severely than white teenagers charged with comparable crimes. The report, called "And Justice for Some," found that youth of color are more likely than their counterparts to be arrested, held in jail, sent to juvenile or adult court for trial, and convicted...
    Apr 28, 2000 | Story
  • As children around the country head back to school, there are growing concerns that their classrooms may now be laboratories for corporate backed market research. With ATM and Coca-Cola machines in the hall ways, text books using products like Gatorade, Sega and Nike to teach kids how to add and free computers in the classroom courtesy of companies like Microsoft or Toshiba, it seems that even in school there is no escaping the corporate marketers.
    Sep 18, 2000 | Story
  • The Senate appeared set to give easy approval to Education Secretary-nominee Rod Paige yesterday as Paige won the support of both Republicans and Democrats on the Senate Health, Education and Labor Committee.
    Jan 11, 2001 | Story
  • A New York State Supreme Court judge last week declared that the state’s method of financing public schools isillegal. Judge Leland Degrasse wrote that the spending formula deprives New York City students of a sound, basiceducation’ guaranteed by the state’s constitution. And by disproportionately hurting minority students, the systemviolates federal civil rights laws.
    Jan 15, 2001 | Story
  • Parents of nearly 5,000 children at five of New York City poorest pubic schools began casting ballots this week in atwo-week election that will decide the immediate future of school privatization in New York City. Edison SchoolsInc., the country’s largest private operator of public schools, must obtain the approval of the parents of more than50% of the children at each school to win the right to manage that school.
    Mar 23, 2001 | Story
  • The article begins like this:

    “Several hundred teenagers dressed in patent leather shoes and crisp green U.S. Army uniforms are greeting andbackslapping each other in the crowded school hallway. Suddenly, a drum corps thunders to life, and the studentshustle into a cavernous hall, where they snap to attention. Chests out, butts in, chins up, and right hands thatsmack their foreheads in simultaneous salute. Stone-faced student "commanders"...

    Dec 28, 2001 | Story
  • An article in the current issue of Mother Jones magazine goes something like this:

    The principal of Mount Anthony Union High School in Bennington, Vermont, Sharon Shea-Keneally, was shocked when she received a letter in May from military recruiters. The letter demanded a list of all her students, including names, addresses, and phone numbers.

    Nov 13, 2002 | Story
  • There is a little known provision in the "No Child Left Behind Act" which requires public high schools to release student contact information to military recruiters. But is there a link between signing up for the SAT, and attracting the interest of the military because of the way the information is distributed? Worried about the prospect of war with Iraq, Youth Radio’s AJ Herrmann decided to investigate and sent us this story.
    Mar 12, 2003 | Story