Guantanamo Topics

Guantanamo-1

Democracy Now! has regularly covered the stories of those imprisoned at the U.S. detention facility located in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, since former President George W. Bush began the so-called "war on terror." The first captives arrived at the detention camp on January 11, 2002.

Newest First | Oldest First
  • Clive Stafford Smith is the legal director of the U.K. charity Reprieve and represents more than 50 prisoners in Guantanamo Bay. He is the author of a new book detailing the inside story of life in what he describes as the "flagship" of secret prisons, "Eight O’Clock Ferry to the Windward Side: Seeking Justice in Guantanamo Bay." [includes rush transcript]
    October 11, 2007 | Story
  • "The resignation of Alberto Gonzales is putting the question of torture, Guantanamo and related issues back in center stage in Washington," said Columbia law professor Scott Horton. "We know down to the end, he was the last major ally of Vice President Cheney on these issues so his replacement could make all the difference." [includes rush transcript]
    August 28, 2007 | Story
  • The American Psychological Association (APA) has voted to reject overwhelmingly a measure that would have banned its members from participating in interrogations at Guantanamo Bay and other U.S. detention centers. While not banning psychologists from participating in interrogations, the council approved a resolution prohibiting involvement in interrogations that use at least 14 specified methods, including sleep deprivation, sexual humiliation...
    August 20, 2007 | Story
  • After the vote by the APA Council of Representatives to reject the proposal that would have prohibited psychologists from participating in interrogations at Guantanamo Bay and elsewhere, several hundred APA members gathered for a town hall meeting on the issue. One by one dissident members took to the stage to voice their outrage. [includes rush transcript]
    August 20, 2007 | Story
  • We take an in-depth look at the case of two reporters whose imprisonment by U.S. forces has gone largely ignored in the corporate media. Al Jazeera cameraman Sami al-Hajj has been jailed without charge at Guantanamo for the past five-and-a-half years. Associated Press photographer Bilal Hussein has spent more than a year in a U.S. military prison in Iraq, also without charge. U.S. officials haven’t made public any evidence of wrongdoing....
    July 19, 2007 | Story
  • Amys_column_default_640x360_2014
    The tenet of medicine to do no harm applies to psychologists, yet they are increasingly implicated in abusive interrogations at U.S. military detention facilities like Guantanamo.
    June 01, 2007 | Columns & Articles
  • We go to Havana for an exclusive interview with the president of the Cuban National Assembly, Ricardo Alarcon. The Cuban and Venezuelan governments have repeated their calls for former CIA operative Luis Posada Carriles to be extradited to stand trial for his role in the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner that killed 73 people. Posada was scheduled to go on trial in Texas on Friday for immigration fraud, but a U.S. federal judge tossed out the...
    May 10, 2007 | Story
  • The Australian citizen David Hicks has become the first Guantanamo prisoner to plead guilty under the Military Commissions Act passed last year. Hicks entered the guilty plea Monday as part of a deal with military prosecutors. Hicks has been held at Guantanamo Bay for the past five years. We speak with Michael Ratner, president of the Center for Constitutional Rights. [includes rush transcript]
    March 27, 2007 | Story
  • It’s been almost one year since the first of six retired US generals began calling for the departure of former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Andrew Cockburn is the author of the controversial new biography, "Rumsfeld: His Rise, Fall, and Catastrophic Legacy." Cockburn talks about Rumsfeld’s role in the Iraq war, his links to the torture of prisoners at Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib, his time as a pharmaceutical...
    March 07, 2007 | Story
  • A top Pentagon official last week urged U.S. corporations to boycott law firms whose attorneys represent detainees at the US prison camp in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In a radio interview last week, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs Charles "Cully" Stimson said companies might wish to shun firms that represent "the very terrorists who hit their bottom line back in 2001." Stimson apologized after his remarks...
    January 17, 2007 | Story