Race in America Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Race in America

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  • Clippers
    The National Basketball Association is set to announce its response to the racist comments of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling heard on a secret recording of an argument with his girlfriend. On the tape, Sterling is upset she posted a picture on Instagram with NBA legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson, telling her not to publicize her association with African Americans. Sterling’s comments have set off one of the NBA’s...
    Apr 29, 2014 | Story
  • Ta-nehisicoates
    An explosive new cover story in the June issue of The Atlantic magazine by the famed essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates has rekindled a national discussion on reparations for American slavery and institutional racism. Coates explores how slavery, Jim Crow segregation, and federally backed housing policy systematically robbed African Americans of their possessions and prevented them from accruing intergenerational wealth. Much of the essay focuses on predatory...
    May 29, 2014 | Story
  • Coates-nobug
    We air part two of our interview with famed essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates about his cover article in The Atlantic, "The Case for Reparations," in which he exposes how slavery, Jim Crow segregation and federally backed housing policy have systematically robbed African Americans of their possessions and prevented them from accruing intergenerational wealth. "It puts a lie to the myth that African Americans who act right, who are respectable,...
    May 30, 2014 | Story
  • Screenshot2014-06-20at1.54.51pm
    Saturday marked the 50th anniversary of the killing of three civil rights workers in Mississippi, a pivotal moment in the 1960s struggle for equality. It took 41 years before a murder conviction was handed down in the case, with former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen found guilty of manslaughter in 2005.
    Jun 20, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Frederick_douglass_portrait
    In this Fourth of July holiday special, we begin with the words of Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery around 1818, Douglass became a key leader of the abolitionist movement. On July 5, 1852, in Rochester, New York, he gave one of his most famous speeches, "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro." He was addressing the Rochester Ladies Antislavery Society. This is actor James Earl Jones reading the speech during a performance of...
    Jul 04, 2014 | Story