Race in America Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Race in America

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  • Clippers
    The National Basketball Association is set to announce its response to the racist comments of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling heard on a secret recording of an argument with his girlfriend. On the tape, Sterling is upset she posted a picture on Instagram with NBA legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson, telling her not to publicize her association with African Americans. Sterling’s comments have set off one of the NBA’s...
    Apr 29, 2014 | Story
  • Ta-nehisicoates
    An explosive new cover story in the June issue of The Atlantic magazine by the famed essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates has rekindled a national discussion on reparations for American slavery and institutional racism. Coates explores how slavery, Jim Crow segregation, and federally backed housing policy systematically robbed African Americans of their possessions and prevented them from accruing intergenerational wealth. Much of the essay focuses on predatory...
    May 29, 2014 | Story
  • Coates-nobug
    We air part two of our interview with famed essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates about his cover article in The Atlantic, "The Case for Reparations," in which he exposes how slavery, Jim Crow segregation and federally backed housing policy have systematically robbed African Americans of their possessions and prevented them from accruing intergenerational wealth. "It puts a lie to the myth that African Americans who act right, who are respectable,...
    May 30, 2014 | Story
  • Screenshot2014-06-20at1.54.51pm
    Saturday marked the 50th anniversary of the killing of three civil rights workers in Mississippi, a pivotal moment in the 1960s struggle for equality. It took 41 years before a murder conviction was handed down in the case, with former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen found guilty of manslaughter in 2005.
    Jun 20, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Frederick_douglass_portrait
    In this Fourth of July holiday special, we begin with the words of Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery around 1818, Douglass became a key leader of the abolitionist movement. On July 5, 1852, in Rochester, New York, he gave one of his most famous speeches, "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro." He was addressing the Rochester Ladies Antislavery Society. This is actor James Earl Jones reading the speech during a performance of...
    Jul 04, 2014 | Story
  • Michael-brown
    Protesters in St. Louis, Missouri, are demanding justice in a police shooting that killed an unarmed African-American teen. Eighteen-year-old Michael Brown was shot to death in the suburb of Ferguson on Saturday afternoon. Brown was reportedly walking in the middle of the street with his friend when a police officer drove up and ordered them onto the sidewalk. The St. Louis County Police is claiming Brown physically assaulted the officer and tried...
    Aug 12, 2014 | Story
  • 0818-seg-01-autopsy-v2
    A private autopsy report has found that Michael Brown — the African-American teenager killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri — was shot at least six times, including twice in the head. Meanwhile, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has ordered the National Guard into Ferguson after another night of protests over the shootings. In a statement, Nixon said he chose to activate the National Guard because of "deliberate, coordinated...
    Aug 18, 2014 | Story
  • Fergusonpolicechiefjackson
    Community outrage grew in Ferguson, Missouri, over the weekend after the police named the officer who shot Michael Brown, Darren Wilson, after withholding his identity for five days. But in naming Wilson, the police also released video footage showing a young man who appeared to be Brown shoplifting a box of cigarillos from a convenience store. The Ferguson police released the video while continuing to withhold all other details about Brown’s...
    Aug 18, 2014 | Story
  • Artmccoy
    As protests continue in Ferguson, we are joined by Art McCoy, who in 2010 became the first African-American school superintendent of the Ferguson-Florissant School District. But three years later, McCoy was suspended without explanation, setting off a controversy that led to his resignation earlier this year. At the time of his suspension, there were no African Americans on the school board, even though three-quarters of the district’s students...
    Aug 18, 2014 | Story
  • Dredscott
    Just miles away from the scene of the protests in Ferguson lies the grave of Dred Scott at the Calvary Cemetery on West Florissant Avenue. Born a slave in Virginia, Scott sued in a St. Louis court for his freedom. The case went to the Supreme Court, resulting in a landmark 1857 decision that African Americans were not citizens of the United States and therefore had no rights to sue in federal courts. The court described blacks as "beings...
    Aug 18, 2014 | Story