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Whistleblowers Topics

Whistleblower

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Whistleblowers

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  • Pressfreedom-map
    A new survey of press freedom around the world finds the United States has plunged 13 spots, now ranking just 46th among 180 countries. The annual survey by Reporters Without Borders also says Syria is the most dangerous country for journalists, showing a correlation between conflict zones and a low level of press freedom. Other countries that fell lower than in the previous year’s survey include the civil-war-torn Central African...
    Feb 12, 2014 | Story
  • Drones
    Watch the 20 most-viewed Democracy Now! segments on our website.
    Dec 31, 2013 | Web Exclusive
  • Amys_column_default
    By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan
    Adopted on Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights comprises the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. While praising it last week and ticking through “our most fundamental rights,” President Obama failed to mention the Fourth Amendment.
    Dec 19, 2013 | Columns & Articles
  • Kirkwiebe
    Veteran National Security Agency official Kirk Wiebe helped develop the data processing system ThinThread, which he believed could have potentially prevented the 9/11 attacks. But the NSA sidelined ThinThread instead of the problem-plagued experimental program Trailblazer, which cost taxpayers billions of dollars. Wiebe was among the NSA officials to face retaliation for blowing the whistle on Trailblazer. During his career, he received...
    Dec 19, 2013 | Story
  • Nsarally4
    As new revelations of National Security Agency spying stoke the ire of Germany, France and Spain, thousands of people marched in Washington, D.C., on Saturday in a rally against government surveillance. Organizers say the protest was the largest to date against NSA monitoring since Edward Snowden’s disclosures became public in June. We hear from Jesselyn Radack, a former Justice Department lawyer who now works for the Government...
    Oct 28, 2013 | Story
  • Amys_column_default
    By Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan

    Oil is the source of so much pain in the world. Around the globe, wherever oil is extracted, people suffer a constellation of injuries, from coups and dictatorship to pollution, displacement and death. Pipelines leak, refineries explode, tankers break up and deep-sea drill rigs explode. The thirst for oil disrupts democracies and the climate. Not far from the burgeoning fracking fields of Colorado, Frederic “...

    Oct 17, 2013 | Columns & Articles
  • Snowden2
    In a Democracy Now! special, we spend the hour with four former U.S. intelligence officials — all whistleblowers themselves — who have just returned from visiting National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden in Russia. They are former CIA analyst Ray McGovern, former FBI agent Coleen Rowley, former National Security Agency senior executive Thomas Drake, and former U.S. Justice Department ethics adviser Jesselyn Radack, now...
    Oct 14, 2013 | Story
  • Davidcoombs2
    Watch the complete interview conducted Wednesday by independent journalist Alexa O’Brien with Pfc. Bradley Manning’s attorney, David Coombs–his first time speaking to the media after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison, and ahead of Manning’s gender transition announcement Thursday. [includes rush transcript]
    Aug 22, 2013 | Web Exclusive
  • Amys_column_default
    By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

    “There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people,” wrote the late historian Howard Zinn, author of “A People’s History of the United States.” These words were included in a statement by Pfc. Chelsea Manning after she was sentenced to 35 years in military prison for releasing hundreds of thousands of documents to the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks.

    Aug 22, 2013 | Columns & Articles
  • Coombs2
    Just after Bradley Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison on Wednesday — and before Manning’s announcement of a gender transition earlier today — independent journalist Alexa O’Brien sat down with Manning’s attorney, David Coombs, for his first interview about the case. O’Brien was one of only a handful of journalists to cover the entire Manning trial and was the first to make transcripts of the...
    Aug 22, 2013 | Story