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Local Campaign Finance Reform

March 20, 1997
Story
WATCH FULL SHOW

Guests

Bill SizemoreInvestigative reporter for the Virginian-Pilot. He was one of three finalists nominated for the 2006 Pulitzer Prize in explanatory reporting for his coverage of Blackwater.
Jeremy Scahill

Author of the New York Times bestseller, “Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army.” Jeremy is a Puffin Foundation writing fellow at the Nation Institute and correspondent for Democracy Now! He testified two weeks ago before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense at hearing on defense contracting.

Lost in all the noise of the campaign finance scandals in Washington are the efforts of hundreds of grassroots organizations nationwide that are fighting for real campaign reform at a local level. Over the next few days, we’re going around the country to hear what grassroots groups are doing to expose and reduce the influence of private money and special interests on campaigns in their towns, cities and states.

Today, we’re going to take a look at how private money in politics effects the environment. We’re joined by Peter Montague, the Executive Director of the Maryland-based Environmental Research Foundation and the editor of Rachel’s Environment and Health Weekly.

GUEST:

PETER MONTAGUE, the Executive Director of the Maryland-based Environmental Research Foundation.


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