US POLICY AND AFRICA

August 14, 1997
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WATCH FULL SHOW

Guests

Greg Grandin

professor of Latin American history at NYU and author of Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism.

The Clinton administration announced recently an initiative to create a 10,000-strong all-African military force to intervene in regional crises. Although the initiative has received tepid support in Congress, some African countries have taken a keen interest and started training soldiers for the international force.

But the Clinton administration’s most recent African military initiative — and indeed its entire policy towards Africa — has been seriously questioned by a range of human rights groups and non-governmental organizations both in Africa and the United States. Demilitarization for Democracy, a research and advocacy organization based in Washington DC, has just released an in-depth three year study on military power and Africa’s democratic transition.

Guests:
• Caleb Rossiter, the director of Demilitarization for Democracy, a research and advocacy organization based in Washington, DC.
• Sulayman Nyang, a professor in the Department of African Studies at Howard University in Washington, DC. He is also a board member of Demilitarization for Democracy.
• Peter Takirambudde, director of Human Rights Watch/Africa, a human rights group based in New York City.