Thursday, November 2, 2000 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: Losing the Vote: The Impact of Felony Disenfranchisement...
2000-11-02

Disabled Access to Voting Polls

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
DONATE →
This is viewer supported news

It is estimated that if people with disabilities voted at the same rate as the non-disabled, between 5 and 10 million more votes would be cast in next weeks election. According to a Federal Elections Commission report, more than 20,000 polling places across the nation fail to meet the minimal requirements of accessibility for people with disabilities. People are not voting because of a lack of ramps or elevator, no accessible parking, doorways that are narrow, inaccessible voting, and ballots that aren’t in braille. It can also be an issue of poll workers deterring or rejecting people, such as those with cognitive disability, from voting. The Center for an Accessible Society believes that the lack of voter participation is directly linked to inaccessible polling places.

Guests:

  • Cyndi Jones, Director of the Center for Accessible Society.
  • Ron Lucey, visually impaired resident of Austin, TX who has personally encountered a number of difficulties while trying to vote.

Related link:

Recent Shows More

Full News Hour

Stories

    Davis_mcbath_dunn_rally_protest_black-lives-matter
    Black Lives Matter: New Film on Jordan Davis Captures Family’s Struggle to Convict White Vigilante
    We are broadcasting from the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, where a new film takes on the subject of the growing nationwide protests over the killing of unarmed African Americans by examining one of the cases to make national headlines in recent years: the killing of 17-year-old Jordan Davis. The film, "3 1/2 Minutes," tells the story of what happened on Nov. 23, 2012, when four teenagers pulled into a Florida gas station to buy gum and cigarettes. They were soon confronted by Michael Dunn, a middle-aged white man who pulled...

Creative Commons License The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.