Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. In this US election year, Democracy Now! is more important than ever. For 20 years, we’ve put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power. We lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. A generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar if you donate right now. That means when you give $10, your donation will be worth $20. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you every day.

Your Donation: $

Deliberate Discrimination: Women's Health Conditions in Afghanistan

October 31, 2001
Story
WATCH FULL SHOW

Physicians for Human Rights has just released a comprehensive report documenting women’s health and human rights in Afghanistan The group planned to release the report even before the September 11 attacks happened, but say the escalated situation in Afghanistan make their findings even more essential. The report finds that Taliban regime’s restrictions on women’s human rights represent some of the most deliberate forms of discrimination against women in recent history. They have compounded profound suffering due to more than 20 years of war, extreme poverty, periodic drought, lack of infrastructure and economic stagnation in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan is one of the poorest countries in the world with one of the highest infant, child, and maternalmortality rates of all countries. The life expectancy of women is 44 years. Only 17% of people in rural areas haveaccess to safe drinking water, and 38% of people in urban areas. Women in the Taliban-controlled areas surveyed byPHR almost unanimously expressed that the Taliban had made their lives "much worse". These women reported worsephysical and mental health, including extremely high rates of major depression and suicide, compared to women livingin non-Taliban-controlled areas.

Guest:

  • Susannah Sirkin, deputy director, Physicians for Human Rights.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.