Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. Today a generous funder will match your donation 2 to 1. That means when you give $15 today, your donation will be worth $45. So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to help make sure Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else.

Your Donation: $
Tuesday, July 23, 2002 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: Usda Recalls 19 Million Pounds of Beef Contaminated...
2002-07-23

U.S. Oil Giant Chevrontexaco Suspends Some of Its Exports After Lightening Strikes and Women Stage An Unprecedented, Peaceful, 10-Day Occupation

download:   Video Get CD/DVD More Formats
This is viewer supported news

The US oil giant ChevronTexaco has been forced to suspend exports from its main Nigerian terminal following fire and protest.

Lightening struck one of the crude oil storage tanks at the Escravos Oil Terminal in the western Niger Delta over the weekend, sending the terminal up in flames.

And, in an unprecedented protest, women peacefully occupied four ChevronTexaco oil pumping stations in the Niger Delta for ten days. They demanded that Chevron build schools and hospitals in their villages, employ more of their people and pay cash compensation for the pollution they say has destroyed their fishing industry.

The women maintained control of the terminal by threatening to remove their clothes, a powerful traditional shaming method which would have humiliated Chevron in the eyes of the community.

After days of negotiations, company executives agreed to build schools, clinics, town halls, electricity and water systems in villages of rusty tin shacks. The company also agreed to give jobs to at least 25 residents and help build fish and chicken farms.

Guests:

  • Nnimmo Bassey, Environmental Rights Action in Benin city, Nigeria.
  • Emem Okone, with the Niger Delta Women for Justice in Port Harcourt.
  • Sokari Ekine, international coordinator of Niger Delta Women for Justice and author of "Blood and Oil: Testimonies of Violence from Women of the Niger Delta"

Related link:


Creative Commons License The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

This is viewer supported news