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Friday, May 2, 2003 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: Did Donald Rumsfeld Aid North Korea’s Nuclear...
2003-05-02

The Secrets of September 11, What Is the White House Hiding? a Conversation with Newsweek Investigative Reporter Michael Isikoff

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As the White House plots a 2004 campaign plan, administration officials are waging a behind-the-scenes battle to restrict public disclosure of key events relating to the September 11 attacks–this according to Newsweek.

An 800-page secret report prepared by a joint congressional inquiry is at the center of the debate.

The report details intelligence and law-enforcement failures that preceded the September 11 attacks, including provocative warnings given to President Bush and his top advisors during the summer of 2001.

The report was completed in December with few details released to the public. Five months later, a "working group" of Bush administration intelligence officials assigned to review the document are refusing to declassify many of its most significant conclusions.

  • Michael Isikoff, investigative correspondent for Newsweek.

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