Hello! You are part of a community of millions who seek out Democracy Now! each month for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the voices of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We produce all of this news at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation. We do this without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on support from viewers and listeners like you. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $10 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make a monthly contribution.

Your Donation: $
Thursday, June 3, 2004 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | PREVIOUS: Black Gold: Controlling Global Oil From Iraq to...
2004-06-03

Boston Protester Faces Felony Charges For Protesting Abu Ghraib Abuse

DONATE →
This is viewer supported news

A 21-year-old college student could spend years in jail on bomb threat charges after he stood silently outside a military recruitment office dressed like an Iraqi prisoner: in a black cape, hooded, wearing stereo wires hanging from his fingers. The police charged Joseph Previtera with making a bomb threat since the stereo wires resembled wires to a bomb.

An article in today’s Boston Phoenix begins like this:

“It was a skinny pair of stereo wires that got 21-year-old Joe Previtera charged with two felonies. A week ago on Wednesday, the Boston College student poked his head through a gauzy shawl, donned a black pointy hood, and ascended a milk crate positioned to the right of the Armed Forces Recruitment Center’s Tremont Street entrance.

“He extended his arms like a tired scarecrow; stereo wires dangled from his fingers onto the ground below.

“Without those wires, the Westwood native could have been mistaken for an eyeless Klansman dipped in black, or maybe even the Wicked Witch of the West...

"But those snaky cords made the costume’s import clear: Previtera was a dead ringer for one of Abu Ghraib’s Iraqi prisoners–specifically, the faceless man who’d allegedly been forced to balance on a cardboard box lest he be electrocuted."

Prvitera stood outside the recruitment center for over an hour. And then the police arrived. Within hours he was facing charges more serious than any US soldier is facing for their role in the actual prison abuse in Iraq. Previtera was charged with three crimes: disturbing the peace, possession of a hoax device and making a false bomb threat. If convicted he could face years in prison.

The Boston Herald reported on Wednesday that prosecutors in the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office are considering ``amending’’ bomb-threat charges against Previtera.

But the Boston police have defended the arrest:

Michael McCarthy, a spokesman for the Boston Police Department told the Boston Phoenix: "It can be implied, with fingers and wires–especially in a heightened state of alert, as we are. Mr. Previtera should know better. He’s a young adult educated at Boston College from a wealthy suburb. I’m sure he knows wires attached to his fingers, running to a milk crate, would arouse suspicion outside a military recruiters’ office [when he’s] dressed in prisoner’s garb. If he has any questions as to why people think he may’ve had a bomb, then he needs to maybe go back to Boston College to brush up on his public policy. Or at least common sense, but they can’t really teach that there."

  • Joseph Previtera, 21-year-old Boston College student who was arrested last week for standing outside a military recuitment office dressed like the hooded Iraqi prisoner held at Abu Ghraib prison. He was wearing a black cape, had a hood over his head and had stereo wires dangling from his hands.
  • David Procopio, spokesperson for Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel Conley

Creative Commons License The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.