Columns & Articles

This Independence Day, Thank a Protester

More than 160 years ago, the greatest abolitionist in U.S. history, the escaped slave Frederick Douglass, addressed the Rochester Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society.

The Supreme Court Makes History: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

The U.S. Supreme Court announced three historic 5-to-4 decisions this week. In the first, a core component of the Voting Rights Act was gutted, enabling Southern states to enact regressive voting laws that will likely disenfranchise the ever-growing number of voters of color.

Dead Man Walking, 20 Years On

Thirty years ago, a Catholic nun working in a poor neighborhood of New Orleans was asked if she would be a pen pal to a death-row prisoner. Sister Helen Prejean agreed, forever changing her life, as well as the debate on capital punishment in this country.

June 20, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Death Penalty

Terror Bytes: Edward Snowden and the Architecture of Oppression

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Edward Snowden revealed himself this week as the whistle-blower responsible for perhaps the most significant release of secret government documents in U.S. history.

Time for a Raise in the Minimum Wage

The 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech is rapidly approaching, commemorating the historic Aug. 28, 1963, March on Washington. King’s words from that National Cathedral speech ring true today, as we face again the crisis of poverty and hunger.

June 06, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Poverty, U.S. Economy

Hammond, Manning, Assange and Obama’s Sledgehammer Against Dissent

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan
One cyberactivist’s federal case wrapped up this week, and another’s is set to begin. While these two young men, Jeremy Hammond and Bradley Manning, are the two who were charged, it is the growing menace of government and corporate secrecy that should be on trial.

Another Memorial Day in This Endless War

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Nearly 12 years after it was first enacted, the Authorization for Use of Military Force remains in force, giving the Obama administration and the Pentagon carte blanche to wage war, to occupy nations, to kill people with drone “signature strikes,” based not on guilt but on a remote analysis of a suspect’s “patterns of life.”

May 23, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Veterans

The Three Heroines of Guatemala: The Judge, the Attorney General and the Nobel Peace Laureate

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Former Guatemalan President Efraín Ríos Montt was hauled off to prison last Friday. It was a historic moment, the first time in history that a former leader of a country was tried for genocide in a national court. More than three decades after he seized power in a coup in Guatemala, unleashing a U.S.-backed campaign of slaughter against his own people, the 86-year-old stood trial, charged with genocide and crimes against humanity. He was given an 80-year prison sentence. The case was inspired and pursued by three brave Guatemalan women: the judge, the attorney general and the Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

May 16, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Guatemala

Addressing the Epidemic of Military Sexual Assault

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan. There is a growing epidemic of rape and sexual assault in the U.S. military, perpetrated against both women and men with almost complete impunity. The Pentagon released a shocking new report on rape and sexual assault in the U.S. military. According to the latest available figures, an estimated average of 70 sexual assaults are committed daily within the U.S. military, or 26,000 per year. The number of actually reported sexual assaults for the Pentagon’s fiscal year 2012 was 3,374. Of that number, only 190 were sent to a court-martial proceeding.

May 09, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Sexual Assault, Military

Pregnant Antiwar Soldier Sent to Prison

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Amid the ongoing violence in Iraq, a young, pregnant soldier has been sent to prison this week for desertion. She refused to return to the war in Iraq back in 2007. Pfc. Kimberly Rivera first deployed to Iraq in 2006. She guarded the gate at Forward Operating Base Loyalty in eastern Baghdad at a time when the base was under constant attack. She said of the experience: “I had a huge awakening seeing the war as it truly is: People losing their lives for greed of a nation, and the effects on the soldiers who come back with new problems such as nightmares, anxieties, depression, anger, alcohol abuse, missing limbs and scars from burns. Some don’t come back at all.”

May 02, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Iraq

Terror in the West, Texas, Night

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

The Boston Marathon bombing and its aftermath has dominated the nation’s headlines. Yet, another series of explosions that happened two days later and took four times the number of lives, has gotten a fraction of the coverage.

April 25, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Texas, Corporate Power, Labor

Peace Activists and Patriots at the Boston Marathon Bombing

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Within seconds, the lives of two individuals, Martin Richard and Carlos Arredondo, from neighborhoods of Boston not far from each other, were thrust onto the world stage.

April 18, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Boston Marathon Bombing

WikiLeaks’ New Release: The Kissinger Cables and Bradley Manning

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

WikiLeaks has released a new trove of documents, more than 1.7 million U.S. State Department cables dating from 1973-1976 that it has dubbed “The Kissinger Cables.”

April 11, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Wikileaks, Bradley Manning, Julian Assange

Gun Control: It’s Time for the Majority to Move

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

New federal gun-control legislation has been declared all but dead on arrival this week. Gridlock in the U.S. Senate, where a supermajority of 60 votes is needed to move most legislation these days, is proving to be an insuperable barrier to any meaningful change in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., massacre.

April 04, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Gun Control

Edie Windsor’s Day in Court

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Edie and Thea met in the early 1960s, in New York’s Greenwich Village. They hit it off.

March 27, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Gay Marriage, LGBT, Marriage Equality, Supreme Court

Tomas Young and the End of the Body of War

Tomas Young was in the fifth day of his first deployment to Iraq when he was struck by a sniper’s bullet in Baghdad’s Sadr City.

March 21, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Iraq, Veterans

Starving for Justice at Guantanamo

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Reports are emerging from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay that a majority of the prisoners are on a hunger strike.

March 13, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Guantanamo, Solitary Confinement

Rand Paul’s Filibuster of John Brennan

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

You could say that a filibuster occurs when a senator drones on and on. The problem with the U.S. Senate was that there were too few senators speaking about drones this week.

March 07, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Drones, Drone Attacks

Albert Woodfox’s 40 Years of Solitary Confinement

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Albert Woodfox has been in solitary confinement for 40 years, most of that time locked up in the notorious maximum-security Louisiana State Penitentiary known as “Angola.”

February 28, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Solitary Confinement

Israel, Palestine and the Oscars

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

The Academy Awards ceremony will make history this year with the first-ever nomination of a feature documentary made by a Palestinian. “5 Broken Cameras” was filmed and directed by Emad Burnat, a resident of the occupied Palestinian West Bank town of Bil’in, along with his Israeli filmmaking partner Guy Davidi. “5 Broken Cameras” is in competition at the Oscars with an Israeli documentary, “The Gatekeepers,” a film that features interviews with the six surviving former directors of Israel’s Shin Bet, the country’s secret internal security service.

February 21, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Israel & Palestine, Film, Oscars, Art & Politics

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