Columns & Articles

Nuclear’s Demise, From Fukushima to Vermont

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Welcome to the nuclear renaissance. Entergy Corp., one of the largest nuclear-power producers in the United States, issued a surprise press release Tuesday, saying it plans "to close and decommission its Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Vernon, Vt. While the press release came from the corporation, it was years of people’s protests and state legislative action that forced its closure. At the same time that activists celebrate this key defeat of nuclear power, officials in Japan admitted that radioactive leaks from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear catastrophe are far worse than previously acknowledged.

August 29, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Japan, Nuclear Power, Vermont Yankee

Manning Wronged AND Miranda’s Rights

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

“There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people,” wrote the late historian Howard Zinn, author of “A People’s History of the United States.” These words were included in a statement by Pfc. Chelsea Manning after she was sentenced to 35 years in military prison for releasing hundreds of thousands of documents to the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks.

"Stop-and-Frisk": The World According to Questlove

Hip-hop hit a milestone this week, turning 40 years old. The same week, federal district court Judge Shira Scheindlin, in a 195-page ruling, declared the New York City Police Department’s practice of stop-and-frisk unconstitutional. Hip-hop and stop-and-frisk are central aspects of the lives of millions of people, especially black and Latino youths. Despite his success as an accomplished musician and producer, Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson confronts racism in his daily life.

August 15, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles

Suggested Vacation Reading for President Obama: "Catch-22"

As the Obama family heads to their annual summer vacation on Martha’s Vineyard, perhaps the president should take along a copy of "Catch-22" for some beach reading. Joseph Heller’s classic, satirical antiwar novel, published in 1961 and based on his experiences as a bombardier in the second world war, is sadly relevant today, as Obama’s wars, in Afghanistan and beyond, drag on.

August 08, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles

Bradley Manning’s Convictions

Bradley Manning took incredibly courageous actions to release data, to pierce the fog of war, to make public the machinations of modern American war-making.

August 01, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Bradley Manning, Whistleblowers

America’s Real Subversives: FBI Spying Then, NSA Surveillance Now

As the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington nears, let’s not forget the history of agency overreach and abuse of power

Let the Light of Mandela Shine on U.S. Injustice

As the world celebrates Nelson Mandela’s 95th birthday, it is timely to reflect on his life, spent fighting for equality for people of color who long suffered under South Africa’s apartheid regime.

This Year’s Best-Kept Secret: The Next Generation of Community Radio

A microphone and a radio transmitter in the hands of a community organizer imparts power, which some liken to the life-changing impact when humans first tamed fire.

July 11, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, LPFM, Media Policy, Media Analysis, FCC

This Independence Day, Thank a Protester

More than 160 years ago, the greatest abolitionist in U.S. history, the escaped slave Frederick Douglass, addressed the Rochester Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society.

The Supreme Court Makes History: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

The U.S. Supreme Court announced three historic 5-to-4 decisions this week. In the first, a core component of the Voting Rights Act was gutted, enabling Southern states to enact regressive voting laws that will likely disenfranchise the ever-growing number of voters of color.

Dead Man Walking, 20 Years On

Thirty years ago, a Catholic nun working in a poor neighborhood of New Orleans was asked if she would be a pen pal to a death-row prisoner. Sister Helen Prejean agreed, forever changing her life, as well as the debate on capital punishment in this country.

June 20, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Death Penalty

Terror Bytes: Edward Snowden and the Architecture of Oppression

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Edward Snowden revealed himself this week as the whistle-blower responsible for perhaps the most significant release of secret government documents in U.S. history.

Time for a Raise in the Minimum Wage

The 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech is rapidly approaching, commemorating the historic Aug. 28, 1963, March on Washington. King’s words from that National Cathedral speech ring true today, as we face again the crisis of poverty and hunger.

June 06, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Poverty, U.S. Economy

Hammond, Manning, Assange and Obama’s Sledgehammer Against Dissent

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan
One cyberactivist’s federal case wrapped up this week, and another’s is set to begin. While these two young men, Jeremy Hammond and Bradley Manning, are the two who were charged, it is the growing menace of government and corporate secrecy that should be on trial.

Another Memorial Day in This Endless War

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Nearly 12 years after it was first enacted, the Authorization for Use of Military Force remains in force, giving the Obama administration and the Pentagon carte blanche to wage war, to occupy nations, to kill people with drone “signature strikes,” based not on guilt but on a remote analysis of a suspect’s “patterns of life.”

May 23, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Veterans

The Three Heroines of Guatemala: The Judge, the Attorney General and the Nobel Peace Laureate

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Former Guatemalan President Efraín Ríos Montt was hauled off to prison last Friday. It was a historic moment, the first time in history that a former leader of a country was tried for genocide in a national court. More than three decades after he seized power in a coup in Guatemala, unleashing a U.S.-backed campaign of slaughter against his own people, the 86-year-old stood trial, charged with genocide and crimes against humanity. He was given an 80-year prison sentence. The case was inspired and pursued by three brave Guatemalan women: the judge, the attorney general and the Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

May 16, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Guatemala

Addressing the Epidemic of Military Sexual Assault

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan. There is a growing epidemic of rape and sexual assault in the U.S. military, perpetrated against both women and men with almost complete impunity. The Pentagon released a shocking new report on rape and sexual assault in the U.S. military. According to the latest available figures, an estimated average of 70 sexual assaults are committed daily within the U.S. military, or 26,000 per year. The number of actually reported sexual assaults for the Pentagon’s fiscal year 2012 was 3,374. Of that number, only 190 were sent to a court-martial proceeding.

May 09, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Sexual Assault, Military

Pregnant Antiwar Soldier Sent to Prison

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Amid the ongoing violence in Iraq, a young, pregnant soldier has been sent to prison this week for desertion. She refused to return to the war in Iraq back in 2007. Pfc. Kimberly Rivera first deployed to Iraq in 2006. She guarded the gate at Forward Operating Base Loyalty in eastern Baghdad at a time when the base was under constant attack. She said of the experience: “I had a huge awakening seeing the war as it truly is: People losing their lives for greed of a nation, and the effects on the soldiers who come back with new problems such as nightmares, anxieties, depression, anger, alcohol abuse, missing limbs and scars from burns. Some don’t come back at all.”

May 02, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Iraq

Terror in the West, Texas, Night

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

The Boston Marathon bombing and its aftermath has dominated the nation’s headlines. Yet, another series of explosions that happened two days later and took four times the number of lives, has gotten a fraction of the coverage.

April 25, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Texas, Corporate Power, Labor

Peace Activists and Patriots at the Boston Marathon Bombing

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Within seconds, the lives of two individuals, Martin Richard and Carlos Arredondo, from neighborhoods of Boston not far from each other, were thrust onto the world stage.

April 18, 2013 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Boston Marathon Bombing

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