Columns & Articles

"Republicans Divided, Citizens United." By Amy Goodman

The Republican caucuses in Iowa show the 2012 presidential election promises to be long, contentious, extremely expensive and perhaps more negative than any in history.

"If You Can’t Beat Them, Enjoin Them (From Voting)." By Amy Goodman

All eyes are on Iowa this week, as the hodgepodge field of Republican contenders seek a win, or at least “momentum,” in the campaign for the party’s presidential nomination. But behind the scenes, a battle is being waged by Republicans—not against each other, but against American voters.

"Bradley Manning and the Fog of War." By Amy Goodman

Accused whistle-blower Pvt. Bradley Manning turned 24 Saturday. He spent his birthday in a pretrial military hearing that could ultimately lead to a sentence of life … or death. Manning stands accused of causing the largest leak of government secrets in United States history.

December 21, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Bradley Manning, Wikileaks, DADT, LGBT, Civil Rights

"Climate Apartheid." By Amy Goodman

The U.N.‘s 17th “Conference of Parties,” or COP 17, negotiations were extended, virtually nonstop, through Sunday, in hopes of avoiding complete failure. But despite optimistic pronouncements to the contrary, many believe the Kyoto Protocol died in Durban.

"Listen to the People, Not the Polluters." By Amy Goodman

There is a growing consensus here at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Durban, South Africa, that the United States is the main impediment to progress at these crucial talks. The fossil-fuel industry exerts enormous influence over the U.S. government, and over the U.S. public, with tens of millions of dollars on lobbying and PR campaigns to shape public opinion. Scientists and activists here and around the world are urging the negotiators to, "Listen to the People, Not the Polluters."

December 07, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Durban Climate Summit 2011, Climate Change

"Cry, the Beloved Climate." By Amy Goodman

The United Nations’ annual climate change summit descended on Durban, South Africa, this week, but not in time to prevent the tragic death of Qodeni Ximba. The 17-year-old was one of 10 people killed in Durban on Sunday, the night before the U.N. conference opened, when torrential rains pummeled the seaside city of 3.5 million.

"Pulling Accounts From the Unaccountable." By Amy Goodman

Even though Heather Carpenter was outside of Citibank, a plainclothes officer had identified her as an Occupy Wall Street protester. She said she was a customer and showed her receipt. To her shock, as documented by video, Heather was grabbed from behind by a plainclothes officer who began forcing her into the bank. She screamed, but within seconds disappeared into the vestibule, surrounded by a dozen cops, where she was roughly handcuffed and arrested.

"The Brave New World of Occupy Wall Street." By Amy Goodman

We got word just after 1 a.m. Tuesday that New York City police were raiding the Occupy Wall Street encampment. I raced down with the “Democracy Now!” news team to Zuccotti Park, renamed Liberty Square. Hundreds of riot police had already surrounded the area.

"Keystone XL: Ring Around the Rose Garden" By Amy Goodman

Since President Barack Obama took office, a broad, international coalition against has formed against the planned Keystone XL pipeline, intended to run from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada, to the Gulf Coast of Texas. Now the deadline for its approval or rejection is at hand.

"Call of Duty: Veterans Join the 99 Percent" By Amy Goodman

11-11-11 is not a variant of Herman Cain’s much-touted 9-9-9 tax plan, but rather the date of this year’s Veterans Day. This is especially relevant, as the U.S. has now entered its second decade of war in Afghanistan, the longest war in the nation’s history. U.S. veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are appearing more and more on the front lines—the front lines of the Occupy Wall Street protests, that is.

"Globalizing Dissent, From Tahrir Square to Liberty Plaza" By Amy Goodman

The winds of change are blowing across the globe. What triggers such change, and when it will strike, is something that no one can predict.

"The Arc of the Moral Universe, From Memphis to Wall Street" By Amy Goodman

The national memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. was dedicated last Sunday. President Barack Obama said of Dr. King, “If he were alive today, I believe he would remind us that the unemployed worker can rightly challenge the excesses of Wall Street without demonizing all who work there.” The dedication occurred amidst the increasingly popular and increasingly global Occupy Wall Street movement. What Obama left unsaid is that King, were he alive, would most likely be protesting Obama administration policies.

"A New Bush Era or a Push Era?" By Amy Goodman

While President Obama has made concession after concession to both the corporate-funded tea party and his Wall Street donors, now that he is again in campaign mode, his progressive critics are being warned not to attack him, as that might aid and abet the Republican bid for the White House. Enter the 99 percenters.

"Policing the Prophets of Wall Street" By Amy Goodman

The Occupy Wall Street protest grows daily, spreading to cities across the United States. “We are the 99 percent,” the protesters say, “that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1 percent.”

"Troy Davis and the Machinery of Death" By Amy Goodman

On Sept. 21 at 7 p.m., Troy Anthony Davis was scheduled to die. I was reporting live from outside Georgia’s death row in Jackson, awaiting news about whether the Supreme Court would spare his life.

"99 Percenters Occupy Wall Street" By Amy Goodman

2,000 people occupied Wall Street on Saturday. They weren’t carrying the banner of the tea party, the Gadsden flag with its coiled snake and the threat “Don’t Tread on Me.” Yet their message was clear:“We are the 99 percent that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1 percent.”

"Troy Davis and the Politics of Death." By Amy Goodman

Death brings cheers these days in America. In this week’s Republican presidential debate, when CNN’s Wolf Blitzer asked, hypothetically, if a man who chose to carry no medical insurance, then was stricken with a grave illness, should be left to die, cheers of “Yeah!” filled the hall. When, in the prior debate, Gov. Rick Perry was asked about his enthusiastic use of the death penalty in Texas, the crowd erupted into sustained applause. This dynamic is why challenging the death sentence to be carried out against Troy Davis by the state of Georgia on Sept. 21 is so important.

September 14, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, Death Penalty, Troy Davis, Rick Perry, Texas, Prison

"9/11 Victim 0001: Father Mychal’s Message" By Amy Goodman

The body bag marked “Victim 0001” on Sept. 11, 2001, contained the corpse of Father Mychal Judge, a Catholic chaplain with the Fire Department of New York. His was the first recorded death from the attacks that morning. His life’s work should be central to the 10th anniversary commemorations of the Sept. 11 attacks: peace, tolerance and reconciliation.

September 07, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, 9/11, New York, Gay Rights, 9/11 anniversary, War, Peace, Catholic Church

"Cheney, Rumsfeld and the Dark Art of Propaganda." By Amy Goodman

“When one lies, one should lie big, and stick to it,” wrote Joseph Goebbels, Germany’s Reich minister of propaganda, in 1941. Former Vice President Dick Cheney seems to have taken the famous Nazi’s advice in his new book, “In My Time.”

August 31, 2011 |  Filed under  Columns & Articles, War on Terror, Iraq, Afghanistan, Dick Cheney, War, Bush

"D.C. Protests That Make Big Oil Quake." By Amy Goodman

The White House was rocked Tuesday, not only by a 5.8-magnitude earthquake, but by the protests mounting outside its gates. More than 2,100 people say they’ll risk arrest there during the next two weeks. They oppose the Keystone XL pipeline project, designed to carry heavy crude oil from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada, to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

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