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Friday, October 18, 1996

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  • The Center for Responsive politics

    The Center for Responsive politics issued its big report yesterday on campaign contributions in the 1996 election cycle. The Center, one of the leading groups that tracks the corrupting influence of money on politics and our democracy, has found that cigarette maker Phillip Morris is the number one campaign stocking stuffer. Other top donors include AT&T, trial lawyers, unions, RJR Nabisco and Financial companies like securities and real estate firms. Big business outspends labor 7 to 1.

  • Indonesian money and U.S. foreign policy.

    As we’ve been reporting over the last week, Indonesia has been making headlines ever since two East Timorese independence and human rights activists were named winners of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. In the past week, the Los Angeles Times and other media have revealed in dozens of articles and news reports that the Clinton campaign has accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars from billionaire Indonesian family tied to the brutal Suharto dictatorship. Now, GOP Presidential hopeful Bob Dole has been raising the issue on the campaign stump and House Speaker Newt Gingrich is calling for hearings on whether the Indonesian money has affected U.S. foreign policy and trade policy toward Indonesia.

  • The Puerto Rican civil rights movement

    Tonight, and coming week on many public television stations, a new documentary will debut that looks back at the Puerto Rican civil rights movement led by the young Lords in the 1960 and 70s. The young Lords were a militant Latino group that rose up in the barrios of Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia and other major cities. Like the Black Panthers, the Lords galvanized a generation of activists to provide much needed services to communities long ignored by politicians.