Wednesday, November 20, 1996

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  • The US government reaches settlement with victim and their families for damage done by radiation experiments

    Segment Summary:
    Energy Secretary Hazel O’Leary announced today that the US Government has reached a 4.8 million dollar settlement with 12 victims of plutonium testing. 11 of the 12 victims were tested without their knowledge, a fact confirmed by Secretary O’Leary in her speech, which went on the denounce any future action of this kind. Amy Goodman follows with an interview with Ellmarine Whitman Bell, daughter of Elmer Allen, a man who was secretly injected with plutonium in 1946 during a stay at the University of California/San Francisco hospital to treat his leg. Goodman and Whitman Bell discuss the Whitman Bell family’s decision not to participate in the settlement offered by the US Government. Arjun Makajani, President of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research and author of "Plutonium: Deadly Gold of the Nuclear Age", joins the interview in progress to acknowledge that Secretary O’Leary’s admission of responsibility is in fact progress, and relates the story of how he, Ms. Whitman Bell and others visited Japan to meet with victims of the Hiroshima bombing attacks to share stories about their experiences.

  • Plutonium in the Pacific

    Segment Summary:
    When the Mars Space Probe crashed off the coast of Chile, 4 batteries holding up to a half a pound of deadly plutonium were released into the ocean, an amount that could potentially destroy the entire eco-system of the area. Carl Grossman, producer of the documentary "Nukes in Space: Nuclearization and Weaponization of the Heavens", maintains that plans are still in place to send even larger amounts of plutonium into space and discusses the planned Cassini Space Probe mission. This mission would launch 72 pounds of plutonium into orbit around Venus and back, enough to expose 99% of the earth’s population to radiation if it were accidentally released into the atmosphere upon re-entry. Grossman has been covering this issue for a decade, but laments his failure to get wider recognition of the issue due to media sponsorship of energy corporations such as Westinghouse and GE ("the Coke and Pepsi of nuclear power").

  • An interview with Stan Goff: US Special Forces units in South and Central America

    Segment Summary:
    Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzales of the New York Daily News interview Stan Goff, a retired Master Sergeant and activist. In part two of the interview, Goff discusses his experiences in Central and South America, focusing on Special Forces anti-guerilla training in Peru during the "War on Drugs"; the discovery of the bodies of murdered nuns in El Salvador; and the CIA presence in Guatemala, and their knowledge of assassinations of civilians in that country.