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Wednesday, December 18, 1996

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  • Postponed Execution of Joseph O’Dell

    The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday postponed the execution of Virginian death row inmate Joseph O’Dell. O’Dell was convicted in the 1985 rape and murder strangulation of Helen Schartner. At the time of the slaying, O’Dell was on parole for kidnapping and robbery convictions in Florida. He says that DNA evidence can prove his innocence. O’Dell’s case has garnered international attention, especially in Italy where opposition to the death penalty is strong. In fact the Pope, the Italian President and Prime Minister have all urged the U.S. to grant O’Dell clemency.

  • Lockheed Martin Benefits from Welfare Reform Initiative

    As states around the U.S. implement welfare reform initiatives, it’s not surprising that corporations are strategizing to make money off of these changes. But here’s a twist: one of the companies going for the gold is Lockheed Martin, this country’s largest DEFENSE contractors.

  • Conference on Internet Political Influence

    While the 1996 election campaign will hardly be remembered for its visionary leaders, powerful slogans, meaningful promises or surprising results, there was one new and interesting element in the mix this year. On-line politics, e-mail and the world wide web were all used as an alternative means of communicating political information. It’s still unclear how the internet affected the outcome of the 96 Presidential and Congressional elections. And many questions remain on whether virtual politics are good for democracy, and whether the world wide web can revive civic involvement and voter participation. A conference to discuss these issues and the future of on-line politics was held last week in San Francisco. Pacifica National Affairs Correspondent Larry Bensky was there and has this report.