An important message for you from Amy Goodman

Your Donation: $

Monday, December 23, 1996

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • Newt Gingrich admits he violated House ethics rules

    After an extensive investigation, a House ethics subcommittee found Gingrich brought discredit to the House by using tax-exempt money for political purposes and by providing the committee with unreliable information about the role of the GOPAC Political Action Committee in a college course he taught. An excerpt from a news conference with David Bonior (D) and Bill Paxon(r) illustrates the partisan nature of the controversy. Gary Ruskin, Director of the Congressional Accountability Project, goes into the findings and allegations of the subcommittee and discusses who the committee is made of.

  • "Not in Our Town" Campaign: Citizens Take A Stand Against Hate Crimes In 1996

    In 1995, PBS aired "Not in Our Town", a documentary about the community’s efforts in Billings, Montana to take a stand against a series of hate crimes. The film recounted how, after services at an African American church were disrupted by skinheads, members of other denominations throughout Billings attended the church to help secure it. The film also documented how 30 members of the painters union showed up to help restore the home of a Native American family which had been defaced with racist graffiti, and how after a Jewish cemetery was desecrated, the local newspaper printed full-page Menorahs that were subsequently displayed in nearly 10,000 homes and businesses. Today, PBS airs "Not in Our Town II", which covers scores of other communities around the country that were inspired by the people of Billings. The two guests, Patrice O’Neil, producer of the PBS piece and Brian Brady, chief of police of Novato, CA discuss the role of law enforcement in dealing with hate violence. Brady emphasizes the importance for the police to have a clear policy for a prompt, sustained effective response to hate crimes.