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Monday, March 11, 1996

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  • Money Talks

    Amy Goodman talks with Becky Cain and Richard Harwood about a project to bring citizens together in six cities to discuss the problem of money in politics. Citizens will discuss the problem, meet with elected officials and others affected by money in politics, and make policy recommendations. Participants will be chosen at random, and the emphasis will be on discussion, rather than the canned question-and-answer format that reduces the value of town hall-style projects.

    Segment Subjects (keywords for the segment): Campaign financing,public participation

    GUESTS:

  • Super Tuesday in Mississippi and Tennessee

    On the eve of Super Tuesday, Mary Coleman discusses issues of political interest in Mississippi in light of her recent work in emerging democracies in Africa and Eastern Europe. She focuses on problems of poverty, unemployment, and racism. She highlights the twin pillars of democracy and poverty in the
    U.S., and contends that government and corporations must be held accountable.  
    Jim Sessions discusses political issues in Tennessee, including the traditional use of social issues such as the debate over evolution in schools to distract from real issues, such as job insecurity. Both report that Republican candidates have largely avoided both states.

    Segment Subjects (keywords for the segment): Mississippi, Tennessee, Republican primary, 1996 presidential election

    GUESTS:

  • Tom Foley

    Larry Bensky talks with retired Speaker Tom Foley about the circumstances of his election loss, bipartisan tensions in Congress, the political obstacles to campaign finance reform, the  
    relatively low cost of congressional pensions, and the decline in public trust in government.