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Wednesday, March 6, 1996

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  • Bob Dole Sweeps Eight States in Junior Tuesday Primaries

    Bob Dole is the strong frontrunner after the Junior Tuesday Primaries, coming out ahead in eight states and making his nomination as the Republican Party’s presidential candidate appear quite secure. Pat Buchanan, meanwhile, seems stuck in a 30% voter approval margin; more than half of voters from Tuesday’s exit polls expressed that they felt Buchanan’s views were too extreme. Pacifica Radio’s National Affairs Correspondent Larry Bensky proposes that Buchanan will remain in the race for the Republican nomination so that he may further build upon his conservative political movement. It is possible that Buchanan may opt to run as a third party candidate if his bid for the Republican slot is unsuccessful. Steve Forbes may also stay in the running simply to push his economic plans into the Republican platform; if successful he stands to reap significant financial benefits.

  • Senator Cynthia McKinney on Georgia’s Political Climate

    Cynthia McKinney comments on the recent Georgia Primary, the overall political climate in Georgia and her experiences in Washington as Georgia’s first African-American female Congresswoman. McKinney states that Georgia’s Republican voters were left in a state of confusion when their favored candidate, Phil Graham, unexpectedly pulled out of the race. Pat Buchanan ended up as the second choice for over 30% of the voters and would likely have captured more votes were it not for his hefty political baggage. McKinney also discusses the controversial issue of race-conscious voter districting, and groups such as the "Campaign for a Color-Blind America", which she views as a divisive force in the democratic process that attempts to deny the existence of racism in contemporary American society.

  • The King-Maker: Alfonse D’amato Campaigns for Bob Dole

    Bob Dole is counting on colleague Alfonse D’amato’s fundraising savvy and widespread connections to pave his way into the White House. D’amato, a Republican Senator from New York is expected to bolster Dole votes in the upcoming New York Primary. Reporter Dennis Bernstein, who has extensively investigated D’amato’s background, says that the Senator has been involved in every major New York financial scandal since the 1980’s, but has been able to maintain his power thanks to his wealth and deep entrenchment in New York’s "old boys’ network". Bernstein also addresses D’amato close ties with supporters Puerto Rico, from whom substantial (and in many cases illegal) campaign fund contributions have been made both for D’amato and for Bob Dole.
    New York City Public Advocate Mark Green, who previously went up against Alfonse D’amato for a seat in the New York Senate, also weighs in on D’amato’s questionable political history and alleged connections with organized crime. D’amato’s popularity among New York voters is waning; a recent poll indicates that if Green were to challenge D’amato again, he could win.

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