Friday, April 5, 1996

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • Media Monopolization

    We discuss media monopolization: the history of corporate ownership of major media outlets including the four corporations that currently own the major TV news operations, as well as the handful of individuals that profit from corporate mergers, and how these owners and their money influence the policy and congressional legislation that supports telecommunications/media conglomerates. We talk with Mark Crispin Miller about the impact of individual corporations and monopolies on media coverage and content; the clear connection between the degeneration of media content and the poor quality of the cultural product on the one hand, and the dominance of these few commercial entities on the other. Miller argues that if this connection can be clearly demonstrated to the American people despite the self-serving restrictions imposed by the megamedia conglomerates, the anti-trust movement will gain popular support. Our conversation includes discussion of the anti-trust movement, notably the work of the Cultural Environment Movement, and the importance for all anti-trust activists to recognize the role that media monopolization plays in controlling the news, images, and information that gets to the public.

  • The Healthcare Crisis In America

    The current state of US health care and the connection between the declining health of the American people and the rising profits of large insurance companies, specifically the influence these companies have on health care policy, health insurance availability, and health care legislation is discussed. Dr. Vicente Navarro argues that US health care reform must be proceeded by profound political reform, including the necessity of building of a coalition of people who are involved in different social issues–from labor reform to environmental issues to women’s rights, etc. – in order to create a formidable social force for political change, including the establishment of new political parties. Our discussion includes an explanation of the single payer health insurance not as "socialized medicine" as some critics assert, but a means by which the federal government — rather than private companies – pays for and contracts with the private sector for the delivery of services and thus can be held directly accountable for the health care of all its citizens.