Wednesday, May 29, 1996

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • POLITICAL HEADLINES

  • Whitewater Verdicts

    In Little Rock, Arkansas yesterday, a jury handed down guilty verdicts in the Whitewater trial of Clinton business partners James McDougal, Susan McDougal and Governor Jim Guy Tucker. James McDougal, a former S & L owner, was convicted of 18 charges of conspiracy and fraud, Susan McDougal was convicted of four counts, including mail fraud and false financial statements. And Arkansas Governor Jim Guy Tucker has announced he’ll resign in July after his conviction for conspiracy and fraud in the real estate scheme. It was vindication day for Whitewater prosecutor and so-called Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr who has been accused of waging a partisan attempt to bring down the President. Bill and Hillary Clinton were not on trial here, but the President was a leading witness on behalf of the defense. His hours of videotaped testimony remains sealed, for now. Larry Bensky, Pacifica National Affairs Correspondent, joins us from Berkeley to explain the verdicts and what they mean in this election year.

  • Today is Election Day in Israel

    It’s The first time Israelis will directly elect their Prime Minister. Polls show the race between Labor Party leader Shimon Peres and Likud Party leader Binyamin Netanyahu is too close to call. Four million Israelis are expected to cast ballots today in an election that’s essentially a referendum on the peace process, the future of Jerusalem and the issue of Israeli security. 25,000 police and soldiers are on high alert in Israel today. ARI SHAVIT, columnist for Ha’aretz, a Hebrew language newspaper In Jerusalem. Shavit has received international attention for a recent column re-published in the New York Times condemning the Israeli attack on a Lebanese refugee camp that killed dozens of civilians. In his piece, he challenged the silence of the Israeli peace movement on the carnage at Qana.

  • Managed Care

    Managed care is the term used to describe the kind of health care that health maintenance organizations or HMOs offer. It’s called managed care because the principles of business management guide the health care service. But there’s growing evidence that the profit motive of HMOs is leading to denial of care and unreasonable restrictions on the more than 50 million Americans who receive their primary care from HMOs. Tomorrow, a House subcommittee will hold hearings on Managed Care Abuses.