Tuesday, September 17, 1996

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  • CIA program in Iraqi Kurdistan

    After the Persian Gulf War, the Central Intelligence Agency spent 100 million dollars on efforts to oust Saddam Hussein, with little to show for its efforts. Since 1991, the U.S. funneled money to the Iraqi National Congress, a group of dissident Kurds and Iraqis. The funds were used to buy light arms, ammunition, communications gear, publishing materials, broadcasting equipment, cars, trucks, food and medicine. But now hundreds, perhaps thousands of U.S.-backed Kurds are fleeing Iraq for Turkey and, asylum in the United States. Joining us to talk about the CIA program in Iraqi Kurdistan is:

  • Police brutality

    Yesterday, President Clinton received the endorsement of the National Fraternal Order of Police. The coveted nod from the FOP will help the Democratic incumbent fortify his get-tough on crime image. The FOP decided to back the President because of his positions on gun control, putting 100,000 more cops on the streets and pension reform. Both Clinton and Dole yesterday put the issues of violent crime and drugs in the spotlight, but neither breathed a word about an issue on the minds of some in New York City this week: police brutality. A judge in the Bronx is hearing the case of a police officer charged with criminally negligent homicide in the killing of a young man named Anthony Baez. WBAI’s Jose Santiago won a National Federation of Community Broadcasters Award for his coverage of the Baez case and joins us now.

  • Nike in Indonesia

    Yesterday in Beaverton, Oregon, human rights activists tried to get shareholders of the Nike corporation to consider a resolution to change its conduct in Indonesia, where workers are paid low wages, often work in abusive and unsafe conditions in a country with a military dictatorship where union organizing has landed many a labor leader in jail.

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