Thursday, September 5, 1996

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  • Crack in the US and the CIA

    Some in the African American community have long claimed that the federal government was responsible for the crack epidemic of the 1980s by letting the potent drug flourish in urban areas. While this accusation has been often dismissed as mere conspiracy theory, there’s new evidence of its truth. The San Jose Mercury News combed recently declassified federal documents and last month published an investigative report drawing connections between crack commerce in Los Angeles and CIA support for the Nicaraguan contras.

  • Crack in the U.S. and the CIA, Continued

    Discussion of crack, continued

  • Defense of Marriage Act

    Next week, the Senate will take up two controversial pieces of legislation on the cutting edge of civil rights in this country. The Defense of Marriage Act or DOMA says that the federal government refuses to recognize same sex marriages and allows states to do the same. While the White House has acknowledged that bigotry and divisiveness are driving this law, President Clinton has pledged to sign it. The gay and lesbian community has reacted with outrage. Fearing that gay voters might not show up in force for Clinton this November, the White House has decided to support a strategy to tag a pro-gay law onto this anti- gay law. The pro-gay law is the Employment Non Discrimination Act or ENDA which would bar job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. At a Capitol Hill News Conference yesterday sponsored by Senators Ted Kennedy, Jimm Jeffords and Joseph Lieberman, ENDA supporters gave testimony on the importance of passing this law. Among them was Nan Miguel, whose story shows how ENDA benefits gay and straight workers alike.

  • Public Education Series: Teaching History

    We’ve been bringing you a special series on public education called "Carefully Taught: Clashing Values in the Classroom." One of the most critical battlegrounds in the culture wars is over the teaching of history. While Progressive educators have tried to introduce a diversity of perspectives into history lessons, conservative critics have been attacking these new curricula as "politically correct."

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