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Monday, January 27, 1997

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  • Center for Public Integrity Releases Information about Helms-Burton Act

    Last year, President Clinton and Congress passed into law the Helms-Burton Act, a law designed to radically tighten the embargo against the government of President Fidel Castro. And this past week, the Washington DC-based watchdog group — the Center for Public Integrity —- released the results of an exhaustive year long study into how money helped fashion the controversial Helms— Burton Act.

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