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Tuesday, January 28, 1997

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  • CIA Activity in Honduras

    Nearly two years ago, The Baltimore Sun broke a major story detailing how a CIA-trained Honduran army unit — known as Battalion 316 — kidnapped, tortured and murdered Honduran political opponents with the full knowledge and complicity of US officials. At the time, the Honduran revelations came on the heels of a string of a number of other sensational expose about CIA relations with death squads in the Caribbean and Latin America, including CIA relations with the notorious FRAPH death squad in Haiti and with the Guatemalan military.

  • Congressman Wolf and East Timor

    As more and more information surfaces on President Clinton’s fund raising ties to wealthy Indonesian families close to Indonesian dictator General Suharto, some Congressional legislators are now saying that President Clinton must show real independence from Indonesian monied interests by taking a leadership role in mediating the 21-year conflict in East Timor.

  • Humanitarian Aid, New Colonialism?

    Humanitarian military interventions have grown rapidly since the end of the Cold War. Whether in Haiti, Somalia, Liberia, or more recently in Bosnia and Rwanda, the images of starving children or entire communities held hostages to corrupt military gangs are increasingly being used to justify US or UN military adventures.