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Monday, February 3, 1997

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  • Public Education Network Conference: Broad Support for Public Education

    A little while ago, Democracy Now! went to a conference on race and education sponsored by the Public Education Network, a group that supports community based organizations in uniting and engaging their communities in building systems of public schools that result in high achievement for every child. The whole idea is that these community based groups are the best mechanism for creating broad support for public education and that public education is fundamental to a democratic society.

  • The Sentencing Project Releases Report About Barring Voting

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