Wednesday, April 23, 1997

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  • Peruvian Hostage Standoff Ended: "Rule of Law" In Peru

    Professor Jose Luis Rénique discusses his captivity by MRTA rebels and the uncertainty of Venezuela’s future, given that country’s endemic problems. He discusses the reasons for the all-but-nonexistent news coverage of the MRTA in the US, and the history of the democratic opposition to the US-backed Fujimori government. The raid, (which ended the hostage-taking), heralds additional difficulties for the peasant population, who already suffer crushing poverty and widespread unemployment. Peru was in chaos in the 80’s and early 90’s–Fujimori’s coup restored order, and the government claims it is the only one capable of improving conditions in Venezuela.

  • Discrimination in the Ranks: New York Police Department

    In 1996 13.7% of the police force of NYC was black, but 35.1% of all officers brought up on charges that year were African American. Discipline of women has occurred at twice the rate of their percentage of the force for the last 15 years, and Latino officers received disciplinary charges about 150% of their relative numbers in the force. Decades of historical data confirms the widespread reports of discrimination against women and minorities, despite continuous denials by the NYC Police Department. The links between discrimination within police departments, police brutality, officer suicides, and consistent, ongoing cover-ups by law-enforcement management are also discussed.

  • US AIDS Experiments on Women and Children in Developing Nations

    Pregnant women in Africa, Thailand, and the Dominican Republic, are being given "treatments" in 9 studies, in which approximately 1000 babies are expected to die as a result of not receiving AZT treatment, the standard regimen. Participants have, in some cases, a 50% chance of getting AZT or a placebo, but all are desperately poor and would be unable to afford paying for AZT. Government and industry claim that these experiments are justified since these patients would not have any chance of AZT treatment. Dr. Wolfe claims that conducting experiments in other countries that would not be allowed in one’s own country which involve the withholding of known effective treatment, violates basic medical ethics to do no harm, as well as Nuremburg Codes, as well as obtaining consent for drug test participation under coercion.

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