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Monday, June 2, 1997

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  • Los Angeles Judge throws out conviction of Jeronimo Pratt 27 years after his jailing.

    Amy is joined by Julian Drous, an attorney for Pratt. Judge Everett Dickey has found that the prosecutions key witness in 1972, Julius Butler, was a convicted criminal and was working as an informant for the police. There will have to be a retrial or the case will be thrown away and Pratt will go free.

  • Supreme court historic cases publicized.

    In recent years one legal scholar has been able to push through the veil secrecy that surrounds the supreme court and publish some of the tapes and transcripts of landmark supreme court decisions. Amy is joined by Peter Irons who has done just that. Irons speaks about his experience of publicizing supreme court tapes and meeting resistance for doing so.

  • Little Rock Arkansas supreme court desegregation case.

    Peter Irons again speaks with Amy about the significance of the supreme court and some of the most important moments in history for the supreme court. We hear recorded excerpts from important supreme court hearings.

  • Malcolm X’s Wife Betty Shabazz on His Life and Legacy, How She Lived Without Him

    1997-0602_betty-shabazz-2

    Betty Shabazz, 63, remains in extremely critical condition. We air the interview Shabazz recently gave to Bernard White and Amy Goodman. Shabazz reflects on her late husband Malcolm X and his influence on the civil rights movement, the Nation of Islam, and the United States in general. Shabazz shares insights into the life and passions of Malcolm X, as well as her life with him before — and after — he was assassinated on February 21, 1965.

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