Hello! You are part of a community of millions who seek out Democracy Now! each month for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the voices of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We produce all of this news at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation. We do this without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on support from viewers and listeners like you. Today, less than 1% of our visitors support Democracy Now! with a donation each year. If even 3% of our website visitors donated just $10 per month, we could cover our basic operating expenses for a year. Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make a monthly contribution.

Your Donation: $

Wednesday, July 16, 1997

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • CAMPAIGN FINANCE HEARINGS

    The Senate campaign finance hearings yesterday established the first direct link between foreign money and a contribution to the Democratic National Committee.

  • Poet Adrienne Rich Refuses to Accept National Medal for the Arts

    Adrienne Rich, one of the most distinguished poets living and working in the United States, refused the 1997 National Medal for the Arts to protest the growing concentration of power in fewer and fewer hands. Rich informed the Clinton administration of her decision in a July 3 letter to Jane Alexander, the chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts, which administers the awards. The National Medal for the Arts is usually awarded annually to 12 people. Past winners include the writer Eudora Welty, the dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham, and the artist Roy Lichtenstein. Adrienne Rich begins the interview by reading her July 3, 1997 letter to Jane Alexander, chair of the National Endowment of the Arts. [includes rush transcript]

  • ANTI-GAY ACTIVITY

    Anti-gay hostility is as pervasive as ever, despite the growing visibility of gay men and lesbians in American culture, according to a major new report out this month.