Thursday, July 31, 1997

download:   Audio Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • TOBACCO DEAL

    As the Senate Judiciary Committee begins hearings on the tobacco industry’s proposed settlement of $365.5 billion dollars to be paid over the next 25 years to settle state lawsuits, the Institute for Policy Studies and the Stakeholder Alliance have released a new study that raises questions about who the real winners and losers will be under the proposed deal.

  • TOBACCO

    In a related report, a new scientific study has found that the use of ammonia by tobacco companies can dramatically increase the levels of nicotine available to the body.

  • CAMPAIGN FINANCE ABUSE

    Documents withheld from Senate investigators until this week show that an Asian businessman who tried to funnel money to the Democrats visited the White House ten times. The documents show that the businessman known as Mr. Wu once dined with the President. Fred Thompson, chair of the committee investigating campaign finance abuse, angrily accused the White House of withholding the documents until after Tuesday’s hearing which explored Wu’s dealings. The committee heard testimony that Wu wired money to one-time Clinton supporter Charlie Trie who tried to donate hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Democrats.

  • SUICIDE BOMBING

    Fifteen people died in a suicide bombing in Jewish West Jerusalem yesterday. It happened in one of Jerusalem’s most crowded markets, injuring 150 people. The bombers struck just as renewed progress in the teetering Mideast peace process seemed possible.

  • CAMBODIA

    At least 14,000 people were imprisoned in Tuol Slen (Tool Sleng) prison, also called the S-21, which was one of the most prominent of many interrogation houses throughout Cambodia during the Khmer Rouge’s four-year reign of terror. Virtually, every one of them was killed and, it turns out, photographed by a teenage Khmer photographer.

Recent Shows More