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Tuesday, January 20, 1998

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  • Demonstration to Close School of the Americas

    Today, more than 2-dozen activists will be tried in a Georgia court fortrespassing at the Fort Benning army base just outside of Columbus,Georgia. They were arrested during a November demonstration where morethan two thousand people gathered to call for the closing of the School ofthe Americas — what critics call "The School of Assassins".

  • Hunger Strike in Florida

    In Florida, tomato pickers ended a month-long hunger strike for higherwages yesterday, as former President Jimmy Carter promised to intervene.The pickers are mainly Haitian, Guatemalan, and Mexican. They work in atown called Immokalee in southwest Florida, where the Everglades begin.

  • Cuba — Santeria

    On the eve of the Pope’s visit to Cuba, a look at the most widely practicedreligion on the island — it’s not Catholicism, it’s Santeria. Born amongthe West African Yoruban people who were taken to Cuba as slaves betweenthe 16th and 19th centuries, Santeria — which means "veneration of thesaints" — fuses African myths with Catholic saints.

  • Burma

    "Burma’s military junta has locked up more than 1,000 pro-democracyactivists in recent years. Long prison sentences under harsh conditionsare debilitating enough, but another threat in the cellblocks is helpingthe government eliminate its opposition: AIDS." — That’s the beginning ofa recent Boston Globe article, also featured in the San Francisco Guardian,by investigative reporters Dennis Bernstein and Leslie Kean.