Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. Today a generous funder will match your donation 2 to 1. That means when you give $15 today, your donation will be worth $45. So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to help make sure Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else.

Your Donation: $

Thursday, October 1, 1998

download:   Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • All Things Censored — Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Writing

    Like in many other states, Pennsylvania authorities have banned media visits to prisoners. They have also barred anybody from using an audio or video recorder in visits with prisoners. Moreover, print journalists are not even permitted to bring in a pencil and paper to take notes.

  • Voices From Nigeria’s Resistance — Nigeria’s Democratic Transition

    Nigeria’s military junta ordered all senior government administrators and ministers to disclose their personal assets in a crackdown on corruption. Meanwhile, groups continue to organize against the so-called democratic transition program of Nigeria’s military ruler General Abdulsalam Abubakar. Some say that it is important to attempt to remove the military from power by using the transition program.

  • Resistance in the Niger Delta

    Democracy Now! documents for the first time Chevron’s role in the killing of two Nigerian activists. The San Francisco-based oil company helped facilitate an attack by the feared Nigerian Navy and notorious Mobile Police (MOPOL). In an interview with Democracy Now!, a company spokesperson acknowledged that on May 28,1998, the company transported Nigerian soldiers to their Parabe oil platform and barge in the Niger Delta, which dozens of community activists had occupied. The protesters were demanding that Chevron contribute more to the development of the impoverished oil region where they live.