Thursday, November 19, 1998

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  • West Rallies Iraqi Opposition Leaders

    In Iraq, the head of the UN weapons inspections team, Richard Butler, has made the team’s first request for documents on Iraq’s banned weapons program. In a letter sent yesterday to Iraq’s Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, the team requests documents that Iraq has previously refused to hand over, including an Iraqi air force account of chemical munitions used in the Iran-Iraq war. The United States has said that it remains poised for a military attack on Iraq if president Saddam Hussein shows any signs of backing out of cooperating with the inspectors. Meanwhile, a top State Department official met yesterday with a member of Iraq’s opposition, and British Prime Minister Tony Blair announced yesterday that he, too, would be hosting a meeting of Iraqi opposition groups in a bid to unite the opponents of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.

  • House Committee Launches Impeachment Hearings

    In his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment hearing today, independent prosecutor Ken Starr will insist that President Clinton abused his power to cover up his affair with Monica Lewinsky, and consistently put up roadblocks and hurdles that slowed the prosecutor’s other investigations. As the hearings get started today, we look at some of those who sit in judgement of the president — and focus especially on Starr and on House Judiciary Committee Chair Henry Hyde.

  • Wrongfully Accused and Death Penalty

    This past weekend, on the edge of Lake Michigan in Chicago, an extraordinary group of people came together and told personal stories that would surpass anybody’s worst nightmare. All 28 of them were sentenced to death for a crime they did not commit. Some of them came to within hours of execution. Many had spent over ten years on death row, and all were released thanks to the work of dedicated lawyers who took an interest in their case. As they gathered at the Northwestern University School of Law for a conference on wrongful convictions, they all sat together on a stage described by one as "a living graveyard." And as they came on stage to tell their stories, they all repeated the same words: "Had the state gotten its way, I’d be dead today."

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