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Tuesday, November 3, 1998

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  • Nader Examines State Elections

    Voters in sixteen states will decide on a total of 61 initiatives, while more than 170 other measures will deal with constitutional amendments and bond issues. In the state of Washington, referendum issues include the possible elimination of affirmative action programs, a raise in the minimum wage, the use of marijuana for medical purposes and whether to ban partial birth abortions. South Carolinians will decide whether to remove a 103-year-old passage in their Constitution that forbids marriage between blacks and whites. Voters in Massachusetts and Arizona will decide whether to introduce major campaign finance reform. Californians face choices on whether to raise taxes on cigarettes, limit classroom sizes and expand casino gambling on many Native American lands.

  • Voices From Around the Country — a Survey of Issues

    A look at election issues, by talking with various voices around the country to learn about regional concerns.

  • Activists Detail Voter Intimidation History

    While many Americans are making a political statement by staying at home today, for millions of others, going to the polls still evokes memories of police dogs, mass arrests and terror tactics by the power structure during the Civil Rights Movement. Voter intimidation is not a thing of the past. In many predominantly African American communities, voter intimidation is still used to discourage the black vote, and takes many forms — from threats of prosecution to police harassment. The U.S. Department of Justice has sent investigators out to 12 states where they have received complaints that minority voters are targeted for voter intimidation. Report Voter Intimidation by calling 1-800-253-3931.