Monday, May 4, 1998

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  • Tibet

    As the Dalai Lama continues his two week tour of the United States this week, Indian police have begun a crack-down on Tibetan activists on a hunger strike. Police hospitalized 6 strikers after 49 days and six more have begun a strike in their place. One Tibetan activist died last week after he set himself on fire to protest the police crack-down. The self-immolation was the first by a Tibetan protesting Chinese occupation. The six activists who remain in the hospital have vowed to continue the strike once they are released. Meanwhile, Chinese President Jiang Zemin in Beijing last week refused to discuss Tibet with US Secretary of State Madelline Albright. We are joined now to discuss the situation of the Tibetan hunger strikers by Nancy Jo Johnson.

  • Guatemala

    Last week’s assassination of Bishop Juan Gerardi Conedera in Guatemala City drew a sharp response from Catholic Church officials who said the government of Guatemala will face serious reprisals if the murder was not solved within 72 hours. Now, the Guatemalan government claims to have a suspect in custody. The United States sent members of the FBI to "aid" in the investigation. However, some Guatemalans question the presence of U.S. intelligence forces, given the history of American support of widespread atrocities and murders over the past 4 decades.

  • Peace Brigades International

    This weekend host Amy Goodman went to the community of Harvard, Massachusetts, 30 miles outside Boston where I spoke to a gathering of Peace Brigades International. The group began about 15 years ago, going to countries where human rights activists were under fire and serving as their escorts. They’ve worked in El Salvador, Haiti, Sri Lanka, and Guatemala. After the assassination of bishop Gerardi last week, it remains to be seen whether more Guatemalan human rights activists will ask for PBI’s help. We are joined now by Liam Mahoney who has been with the PBI for 11 years.

  • Mumia Abu Jamal Commentary

    On April 1st, Democracy Now! kicked off the beginning of the new commentaries written, but not spoken, by journalist and Pennsylvania Death Row inmate Mumia Abu Jamal called "All Things Censored." In November 1996, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections banned all journalists from audio recording, videotaping, or photographing any inmate in a state facility. Democracy Now! aired the last permitted recordings of Mumia Abu Jamal in March.