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Thursday, July 30, 1998

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  • Clinton

    The news almost got lost last Friday, overwhelmed by the Capitol shooting where two Capitol police officers were killed by what appears to be a mentally ill man. On that fateful afternoon, the White House revealed that Clinton had received a subpoena ordering the President to testify before the grand jury investigating allegations of a presidential affair and a cover-up. If it weren’t for the shooting, of course, it would have been the banner headline, because it is the first time in American history that a sitting president has been subpoenaed to testify before a federal grand jury.

  • GM/UAW Settlement

    More than 9,000 members of the United Auto Workers ratified agreements yesterday to end the nearly eight-week strike at two auto parts factories in Michigan, a dispute that has shut down G.M. assembly plants across North America. About 90 percent of workers at G.M.'s Flint Metal plant voted to ratify their pact, while stronger worries about future job security at the Delphi East plant held the approval vote there to 76 percent. The Flint Metal and Delphi East plants waged two of the longest and costliest strikes against the automaker in nearly 30 years, costing G.M. an estimated $2.5 billion in short-term losses, and possibly more serious, further eroding its share of the U.S. auto market. Production rates and health-and-safety grievances are important in the battle between the auto giant and the union, but some labor analysts say the issue that really matters to the two sides is who gets to control G.M.'s redesigned 1999 Chevrolet Silverado pickup and its sister trucks, slated to be launched in September.

  • U.S. Attorney Decries Iraqi Sanctions

    Several dozen people are just completing the first week of their hunger strike outside the U.S. mission to the United Nations. The activists are demanding that the United States immediately lift its economic blockade against Iraq. Earlier in the week, we spoke with one of those hunger strikers — Kathy Kelly, from Voices in the Wilderness. Today we’ll hear from former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark. While he is not currently fasting, he too has repeatedly decried the sanctions. He spoke recently at a gathering of activists at the Bruderhof community in upstate New York.