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Wednesday, July 8, 1998

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  • Nigerian Prisoner Abiola Dies

    Nigeria’s most prominent political prisoner, Moshood Abiola, has died. He collapsed during a meeting with U.S. officials Thomas Pickering, the Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs, and Susan Rice, the Assistant Secretary for African Affairs. The government says Abiola died of a heart attack yesterday in a hospital. Abiola’s family refuses to accept the official version of his sudden death — reportedly of a heart attack — saying the timing of his death is "too convenient." Nigerian officials are promising a full autopsy. However, Abiola’s family says he is to be buried today.

  • Human Rights Watch Releases Police Brutality Report

    In an explosive report released yesterday, Human Rights Watch accuses local governments and federal officials of failing to address a common human rights abuse in the United States: police brutality. The report, called "Shielded from Justice: Police Brutality and Accountability in the United States," charges that shoddy internal investigations do not hold police officers accountable for abusive acts, and that criminal investigations rarely result. The study also says civilian review boards lack the funding and access they need to monitor police adequately.