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Friday, January 22, 1999

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  • Police Brutality in Washington D.C.

    This week, Washington, D.C. Police Chief Charles Ramsey announced that he had asked the Justice Department and the Office of Professional Responsibility to initiate investigations into why the nation’s capital leads the country in police shootings. This fact was uncovered last fall by the Washington Post as part of an investigative series. The Post also found that the department was besieged with scores of complaints and lawsuits alleging police brutality. In announcing his decision, Chief Ramsey said that the move was necessary if the department hopes to regain its credibility with citizens.

  • Senate Trial Gives Glimpse Into Power in Washington

    The White House yesterday concluded its defense of President Clinton, asking the Senate to forgive the president for a "terrible moral lapse," but to acquit him on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice.

  • Hmos and Lawsuits

    In the nation’s largest verdict ever against a Health Maintenance Organization (HMO), a California jury this week awarded $120 million to a schoolteacher whose husband fought fruitlessly until his death against Aetna U.S. Health Care of California for coverage of an experimental cancer treatment. The verdict was described by consumer advocates as a clear sign of the public’s anger at HMOs.