Friday, November 19, 1999

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  • FDA Holds First Hearing On Biotechnology in Chicago

    Yesterday in Chicago, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held the first of three public hearings around the country on genetically engineered products, an event prompted by public pressure for more government openness on the issue. As about 180 attendants heard from a panel mostly composed of pro-biotech experts, hundreds of people who had not been allowed inside the building protested outside.

  • Act-Up Activists Storm Office of U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky

    US Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky, who last week negotiated the Clinton administration’s trade deal with China and will represent the US government at this month’s World Trade Organization summit in Seattle, received a surprise yesterday morning when activists from ACT-UP and other AIDS organizations occupied her office.

  • Vermont Newspaper Fires Reporter After She Publishes Story On Norwich University Training of Indonesian Military

    We now go to a story that is happening all to often in these times of increased corporate media control. A journalist is ousted from his or her job for reporting on a story that conflicts with the interests of the head of their news organization. When the reporter cries censorship, the news organization tries to justify the ouster by discrediting the reporter, and by refusing to acknowledge publicly that the reporter had ever been fired.

  • Tobacco, Nuclear Power and Capital Punishment: North Carolina Residents Fight for Justice

    Democracy Now! is reporting today from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Here are some of the stories that are making the news locally:

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    Juan González on How Puerto Rico’s Economic "Death Spiral" is Tied to Legacy of Colonialism
    Could Puerto Rico become America’s Greece? That’s a question many are asking as the island faces a devastating financial crisis and a rapidly crumbling healthcare system. Puerto Rico owes $72 billion in debt. $355 million in debt payments are due December 1, but it increasingly looks like the U.S. territory may default on at least some of the debt. Congress has so far failed to act on an Obama administration proposal that includes extending bankruptcy protection to Puerto Rico and allocating more equitable Medicaid and Medicare...


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