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Thursday, March 18, 1999

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  • Who Killed Rosemary Nelson?

    Violent protests in a Northern Ireland town and the killing of a former Protestant guerrilla overshadowed St Patrick’s Day peace appeals yesterday by Irish and British politicians and by President Clinton. Violence erupted in the town of Portadown on the eve of the funeral of Rosemary Nelson, a human rights lawyer who was killed this week by a group tied to pro-British paramilitary outfits.

  • Student Anti-Sweatshop Movement

    Citing pressure from the student anti-sweatshop movement, seventeen colleges and universities, including Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Duke and Notre Dame, announced on Monday that they would be joining the Fair Labor Association, a group established by the White House that has formed a code of conduct for apparel factories and created a program to monitor violations.

  • IMF Efforts to Privatize Brazil

    Brazil’s federal judges staged a one-day strike yesterday to protest allegations of corruption in the judiciary and a delay in raising their pay. At the same time, Brazilian president Fernando Enrique Cardozo announced his first overseas trip since the country plunged into a currency crisis this past January. Latin America’s largest economy has struggled to recover from the crisis and rebuild investor confidence, which some economists say is key to financial recovery. In his coming trip to Germany, Cardozo plans to court European investors.