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Monday, March 22, 1999

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  • Violence Escalates in Kosovo

    Tens of thousands of ethnic Albanians fled deeper into rebel-held territory in Kosovo over the weekend as the Serb-led Yugoslav army struck rebel strongholds in the north and north-central parts of the province. Fresh violence also erupted today, as U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke warned Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic that his country was "at the brink" of being hit by NATO airstrikes. Holbrooke launched what U.S. officials called a "final effort" to persuade Milosevic to accept a peace plan for Kosovo before turning to NATO warplanes to force him to do so.

  • Mexico’s Zapatistas Sponsor Referendum

    Mexicans voted yesterday in a non-binding referendum on Indian rights, hoping their voices would break an impasse between the government and Zapatista rebels. The Zapatistas undertook a massive nationwide effort to publicize the referendum, and even met with several top business executives at an exclusive club in Mexico City.

  • Driving While Black

    In many parts of the United States, African American motorists, particularly black men, are stopped by the police because of their race. Critics of law enforcement policies believe that the war on drugs feeds on the stereotype of the violent drug dealer, often perceived as a person with a black or brown face. Statistics suggest that police agencies disproportionately target motorists of color based on this racial stereotype. In Florida, for example, blacks are stopped 6 times more often than whites.